and she began to sing, rather <stir> I thought

gibeq

Senior Member
Polish
Hello natives,
That's me again, I have problems with some word transformation.

"And then she began to sing, rather ........... I thought, Susan Boyle did, and I understood why she had won the competition. ( STIR )
 
  • gibeq

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I was wondering about " stirringly " :

    "And then she began to sing, rather stirringly I thought, Susan Boyle did, and I understood why she had won the competition.

    Does it make any sense?
     

    gibeq

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I am a student of English Philology, and being frank, I've got a really strange but adorable lecturer that writes the texts on his own. This sentence is an extract from his short story ;) Btw. He is Canadian ;)
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    I was baffled this time. Surely it would be 'stirringly' or possibly 'stirred' (depending on who stirs whom :) ), but the grammar of the sentence is still a mystery to me. :)
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    It's more often expressed as "And then she began to sing, Susan Boyle did..." or in plain English "And then Susan Boyle began to sing..."

    As I said, a common usage in speech, e.g: "That's a good car, that is... It was a good evening, your birthday party was... He impressed me, that speaker did..."
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    As Keith Bradford says, it's a bit unusual, but but quite common in speech. And this appears to spoken by a character in a short story.

    Cross-posted.
     
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