And she knows we're probably gonna move on. But you didn't do it, Jessie.

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VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
Preston, Jessie's old friend, and ex-boyfriend, helps her deal with problems she's having now, while she's unable to walk after a car accident. Let her stay at his house, which his wife didn't like. And their prom pictures with Jessie are still up at Preston's mother's house. That's another reason why his wife is not happy about the situation. So he tells Jessie:
— She knows I still think about you. And she knows we're probably gonna move on. But you didn't do it, Jessie. Not you showing up right now. It's just weird timing is all.
Jessabelle, movie

Could you explain to me what he's talking about in the brown part? What does "move on" mean, and what Jessie didn't do?
Thanks.
 
  • se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    "Move on" can refer to a physical change of location or to a mental adjustment to altered circumstances. Apart from that, I doubt this is a language question, and the short extract you have provided is insufficient to answer it.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    "Move on" can refer to a physical change of location or to a mental adjustment to altered circumstances. Apart from that, I doubt this is a language question, and the short extract you have provided is insufficient to answer it.
    Why is it not a language question? I provided a context and asked what "move on" means in this particular context. If the context is still insufficient, just let me know what else you want to know.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Preston is saying that the imminent change in his marital circumstances (his wife "knows we're probably gonna move on") is not due to Jessie turning up. That's just a coincidence, weird timing. The change was going to happen anyway.

    But it's not clear from that limited extract whether the couple intend to "move on" in the sense of patching up their marriage, or whether they're planning to split up.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    move on:
    1. [~ + on + object]to attack as a military target.
    2. [no object]to begin action on something new:We've debated this for hours; it's time to move on.
    3. to leave a position or place:
    • [no object]He moved on to another job.
    • [~ + object + on]The police moved the demonstrators on.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    Let me give some more context then, from the beginning: Jessie gets into a car accident, injures her legs, and the driver, her boyfriend, dies. Having no other relatives, he gets picked up by her dad she hasn't seen for long and moves to the place where she grew up. Soon her dad dies in a fire, and at the funeral she meets Preston. Since she's gotten involved in creepy woodoo stuff at her father's, Preston is helping her deal with it. One night she stays at his house with his wife being displeased with that.

    Now they're sitting in his car by her father's house and Preston tells Jessie that she shouldn't stay in her father's house anymore, but stay at his mother's place now, because she still likes Jessie. So they are going to get Jessie's possessions and get out of there.

    Is it clear now what the brown part is about?:)
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    It is not a requirement that every piece of dialogue be completely comprehensible to everyone. Perhaps if we were to watch more of the movie before this conversation, we might be able to help and find it does make sense, but so far it appears not.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    There's nothing in that further information that confirms in what way Preston and his wife mean to "move on". Although I assume they're splitting up?
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    Although I assume they're splitting up?
    I'd say no.

    Ok, my understanding:

    And she knows we're probably gonna move on. But you didn't do it, Jessie. Not you showing up right now.
    She knows you and me are going to forget/not think of each other completely sooner or later. But when you showed up in my and my wife's life, you yourself didn't move on. Your showing up right now didn't make you move on.

    Does that make sense?:)
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    She knows you and me are going to forget/not think of each other completely sooner or later. But when you showed up in my and my wife's life, you yourself didn't move on. Your showing up right now didn't make you move on.

    Does that make sense?:)
    I don't think so. It works okay with the first two sentences. But if it's really Preston and Jessie who are going to "move on", the following text makes no sense.

    I still think:
    She knows I still think about you. — Preston's wife knows he still has feelings for Jessie
    And she knows we're probably gonna move on. — Preston and his wife have decided they'll soon probably split up
    But you didn't do it, Jessie. Not you showing up right now. — But Jessie turning up wasn't the cause of their decision
    It's just weird timing is all. — That was just coincidence
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    I still think:
    She knows I still think about you. — Preston's wife knows he still has feelings for Jessie
    And she knows we're probably gonna move on. — Preston and his wife have decided they'll soon probably split up
    But you didn't do it, Jessie. Not you showing up right now. — But Jessie turning up wasn't the cause of their decision
    It's just weird timing is all. — That was just coincidence
    Ah, I now understand what you meant! One question, please. Is the meaning of the phrasal verb "move on" here is this?:
    If you move on, you finish or stop one activity and start doing something different.
     
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