"...and shoot on twos for six feet" an obscure phrase

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Olya34

Member
Russian
Can anyone, please, help me to understand a strange phrase from a book "Step-By-Step Techniques of Drawn Animation" by Tony White?
The book is about principles of drawn animation, the author describes some basic techniques of walk movement, sums it up: "Provided you get the basic principles of movement correct, there is no end to the sophistication and detail you can add to produce that little something special in the action", then gives 2 sketch men and writes: "Copy and inbetween the key position here on even inbetweens and shoot on twos for six feet. Then, using the same two key positions (and as many inbetweens as you choose), create you own cycle encompassing as many of the guidelines from this chapter as you can".

I'll attach a scanned page for clarity.

I don't understand the sentence in bold.

First of all, I don't see the second verb: "copy and..." – and what? I would expect something like "copy and paste", "copy and move" two predicate, anyway. But "in-between" is not a verb, it is either noun (an intermediate picture situated between two key figures) or an adverb (at a point between). And here I see one predicate. If the second one is "shoot" then the second "and" is superfluous, isn't it? "Copy and... in such and such place... and shoot..." Looks incorrect.

Then I don't really understand the second half of the sentence. What are "twos"? Two pictures? There are indeed two sketch men, but what on Earth does the author mean by "shoot on twos for six feet"? I found that "shoot for" means "to aim for something". Should I (on the base of two depicted men) aim for 6 feet? As in the bottom part of the leg (I don't think it refers to a unit of measurement) – to supply sketch men with 6 feet each? Or with 3 feet each, 6 feet in total? Why? It sounds strange.

I would be eternally grateful for any help!
 

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  • Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    These are all technical terms in animation. Have you been reading the whole book?
    Shooting on twos is shooting at 12 frames per second instead of 24 fps (shooting on ones).
     

    Olya34

    Member
    Russian
    Thank you for your reply, Myridon!
    In fact my friend is reading the book and she asked me for help with this phrase. She is not a native-speaker either, but she is interested in animation and she now takes her first steps in this field using this book. It might seem strange: two foreigners poring over an English book written for practicing designers... But as it is entitled Step-By-Step Guide I thought there was nothing too specific. And though I haven't read the whole book, I suppose my friend has. She asked for help only with this phrase, I don't know whether it is the first time the term "shooting on twos" is used in the book.
    Maybe I overestimated myself trying to puzzle it out without a deep understanding of how animation really works...
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    But "inbetween" is a verb in the specific context of animation. Inbetweening, or tweening, is "the process of generating intermediate frames between two images, called key frames, to give the appearance that the first image evolves smoothly into the second image." (Source: This Wikipedia page.)
     

    Olya34

    Member
    Russian
    Thank you very much, Egmont!
    I send your responses to her.
    It turns out that she knew that after drawing you're supposed to shoot your animation using film footage. And that each foot of 35 mm film contains so-and-so much frames...
    I didn't, that's why I imagined that "feet" must have something to do with legs, seeing a sketch men with a number of legs.
    It was stupid of me to ask questions before looking closely at the problem.
    Thank you for your assistance!
     
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