and still end up with an aircraft

Discussion in 'English Only' started by hhtt, Mar 13, 2018.

  1. hhtt Senior Member

    Turkish
    "The designer has to choose materials which are available, can be transported to the manufacturing facility (even the homebuilder's basement or garage), can be cut to required sizes with the minimum tools, and can be handled without causing too many rejects due to mishandling ... and still end up with an aircraft of appreciable size, adequate strength and good looks."

    Would you please explain the part "and still end up with an aircraft"? I cannot understand "what ends up with aircraft"

    Aircraft Construction, Riveted Joints (Part 1 of 2)
     
  2. Uncle Jack

    Uncle Jack Senior Member

    Cumbria, UK
    British English
    Despite all the constraints just mentioned, the designer has to still end up with an aircraft of appreciable size, adequate strength and good looks.
     
  3. lingobingo

    lingobingo Senior Member

    London
    English - England
    "The designer has to choose materials which
    (a) are available,
    (b) can be transported to the manufacturing facility (even the homebuilder's basement or garage),
    (c) can be cut to required sizes with the minimum tools, and
    (d) can be handled without causing too many rejects due to mishandling ...
    and [at the end of all that, the designer has to…]
    still end up with an aircraft of appreciable size, adequate strength and good looks."
     
  4. hhtt Senior Member

    Turkish
    OK. I started to understand everything now. But can we say " .... and still reach to an aircraft of ...." instead of "... and still end up with an aircraf of ..."?

    Because I am not familiar with "end up" "reach" seems to me more reasonable. What do you think?
     
  5. lingobingo

    lingobingo Senior Member

    London
    English - England
    Reach has nothing to do with this. Yes, you reach a conclusion, but that’s quite different.

    What you “end up with” is what you have, or how things are, at the end of a process or a series of events.

    My little brother ate all the cake and I ended up with none.
    The game began well but ended up a complete shambles.
     
  6. Uncle Jack

    Uncle Jack Senior Member

    Cumbria, UK
    British English
    "Reach" would be wrong here (and "reach to" even more so), but "arrive at" would just about be possible, I think.
    "End up with" is a common expression though. You should embrace it!
     

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