...and that's my problem

Nucleara

Senior Member
The situation is: I am in charge of an exhibition at the university and I'm the team leader. But I know my weak point is I always forget to tell my team what I know so that they know it too and can keep things going when I'm not there.

When I write it like this: "I always forget to tell them what I know, and that's my problem." I have a slight feeling that it could also mean that it's my problem, my business, and that no one should have to care. (But the truth is I want to say that it's the problem that I have and I'm worried about it.)

What to do think?
 
  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    :) Yes, your understanding is possible, but that form would usually (but not always) be ""I always forget to tell them what I know, but that's my problem."

    I am aware of having a fault/failing, [which I am doing my best to correct]: I always forget to tell them what I know."
     

    Nucleara

    Senior Member
    :) Yes, your understanding is possible, but that form would usually (but not always) be ""I always forget to tell them what I know, but that's my problem."

    I am aware of having a fault/failing, [which I am doing my best to correct]: I always forget to tell them what I know."
    Thank you very much PaulQ. I don't get the last line though--do you mean I should cut the "...that's my problem" part off?
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    In your first post, you expressed the idea that "that's my problem"is ambiguous. I agreed. "The "but" version is the one that indicates that you do not care much about what the other people think.

    I have suggested an alternative that avoids the ambiguity and that indicates that you know your problem is causing difficulties and are trying to correct it.
     
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