And <though> you would call it a burden, a sacrifice, you are mistaken, sir.

park sang joon

Senior Member
Korean
The Count Olaf was determined to adopt two distant relative orphans for their inheritance.
Count Olaf: Mr. Poe. I will raise these orphans as if they were actually wanted. And though you would call it a burden, a sacrifice, you are mistaken, sir. You should be ashamed of yourself. The idea! (He babbles.) Anyway, where do I sign for the fortune, I mean, children?
<From the movie "Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events">
I'd like to know why "thought" is used, not "if."
Thank you in advance for your help.
 
  • Chez

    Senior Member
    English English
    The word that could be used instead is 'although' (not if), meaning 'despite the fact that you would call it a burden...'.

    'though' is a common abbreviation for 'although'.
     

    park sang joon

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you, Chez, for your so kind answer.:)
    But I don't think "though" is much different from "although."
    And I don't have the feeling that the following is coherent.
    "And Although you would call it a burden, a sacrifice, you are mistaken, sir."
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    And I don't have the feeling that the following is coherent.
    "And Although you would call it a burden, a sacrifice, you are mistaken, sir."
    It's perfectly coherent. What do you think is not coherent about it?

    It's not "if," because it's not a conditional; he's assuming that Poe does, in fact, think it's a burden.
     

    park sang joon

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you, pob14, for your so kind answer.:)
    I think "though/ although" is a concessive clause and it should contrast with a main clause.
    But my example doesn't.
     

    park sang joon

    Senior Member
    Korean
    I'm so sorry; I get one more question.:(
    1. And though you would call it a burden, a sacrifice, you are mistaken.
    2. And though you would call it a burden, a sacrifice, it's no burden.
    I'd like to know if I can interpret #1 as #2.
     
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