anda que no

pavon

New Member
Sweden, Swedish and Serbian
The expression is used many times in the novel I am translating. But what does it mean exactly? For example, a maid, la criada, who works in el cortijo, takes the children of los señores to her own house in the village at times, so her husband explains: Anda que no se los ha traído veces por la tarde.
 
  • Alificacion

    Senior Member
    Spain - Spanish
    It's an expression to emphasize a sentence, meaning that what is said is very common/happens a lot/is absolutely true/etc, especially when the other person doubts about it. In your example, it means "she has indeed brought them here a lot of times..."

    I'll try and give you some examples to make it clearer:

    - ¿Tú crees que al niño le gustará el chocolate?
    - ¡Anda que no le gusta! Le he visto comerse una tableta entera. (meaning "of course he does like it...")

    - Me acuerdo de mi época de estudiante. Anda que no me habré pasado horas sentado en la cafetería de la universidad... (meaning "I can't even count the hours I spent..."

    Hope I've made it a bit clearer for you! Saludos!
     

    Mabeba

    Member
    Spain, spanish
    That's a difficult one pavon,

    I would say it is something like an ironic way deniyng something to emphasize it.

    eg: Anda que no he ido yo veces a ese bar (meaning I've been there loads of times)
    Anda que no sabe nada el niño (meaning the boy is very smart)

    I hope it's good enough
     

    Neilz

    Senior Member
    Spain - Spanish
    So, more or less the phrase "anda que no" does mean "how much...."...?
    No Valdo, I'm more confortable with Mabeba's definition. It's emphasizing, not asking...

    When you say "Anda que no se los ha traido" what you really mean is: "Se los ha traido". There is another emphasizing expresion that means the same, and is made the opposite way - by the affirmation "Vaya que si"

    "Vaya que si se los ha traido"
    "Anda que no se los ha traido"

    Both would mean "She DID take them"

    Hope it helps.
    Salu2
    Neilz
     

    Miguel Antonio

    Senior Member
    Galego (Rías Baixas)
    The expression is used many times in the novel I am translating. But what does it mean exactly? For example, a maid, la criada, who works in el cortijo, takes the children of los señores to her own house in the village at times, so her husband explains: Anda que no se los ha traído veces por la tarde.
    hi Pavon

    I think the closest English equivalent is: as if + negation:

    the husband says: as if she had not brought them often in the afternoons

    ¡anda que no lo sabes! as if you didn't know

    hope it helps
     

    panjabigator

    Senior Member
    Am. English
    So just to confirm, this construction is one in which the answer is already assumed.

    Could this be similar to the English tag question "right?"

    Example: "You know you owe me fifty dollars, right?" (The person knows he is indebted). So could I use "anda" in this context?
    "Anda que me debes cincuenta dólares.

    ¿Qué pensáis?
     

    ValeLaPena

    Member
    USA
    English
    It seems like "anda que no" is a form of colloquial sarcasm, no?
    You say something in this way to emphasize that the opposite is true...
    Just a humble suggestion out of observation.
     

    Cerros de Úbeda

    Senior Member
    UK
    Spanish - Spain (Galicia)
    It seems like "anda que no" is a form of colloquial sarcasm, no?
    Quite right.

    It is a colloquial way of making an emphatic statement.

    Contrary to its appearance (with that confusing "not"), it is a very common hyperbolic structure of informal Spanish, used to form emphatic statements.

    Its sense is predicated in the hyperbolic and argumentative nature of our conversation style... It is an emphatic response given to an imagined (alas, non-existent!), comment by our interlocutor, to which the speaker responds, countering, hyperbolically, that "He's not right...!!"

    Emphatically stating something like, "Come on, you know what I'm saying is right...!"

    The phrase is similar to other exclamative and emphatic expressions, particularly exclamative sentences starting with "Cómo";

    - ¡Cómo + afirmativa!
    - ¡Vaya que + afirmativa!

    - ¡(Pero) mira que + afirmativa!
    - ¡Que no + afirmativa!
    - ¡Como si no + afirmativa!

    (*) Notice that these last three also share that ironic sense, of using an inverted expression (of using a negative, to make an emphatic statement), contained, either in the "pero" (in the first case), or in the "no" (in the two latter examples).


    Here is a link to the phrase search engine website 'Fraze it', where there are hundreds of examples of its use;


    (*) Fraze it
    - Anda que no...


    Improve Your Writing skills
     
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    Cerros de Úbeda

    Senior Member
    UK
    Spanish - Spain (Galicia)
    But what does it mean exactly?

    "¡Anda que no se los ha traído veces por la tarde!"

    In English, it is equivalent to any exclamative or emphasizer - best colloquial ones, as this structure is quite colloquial:


    1- Not half
    (Negatives with the expression "not half")
    2- Emphasizers
    (Really - truly / completely)
    3- Exclamatives
    (with "Why,...!", "Gosh,...!", "OMG...!", etc, followed by a sentence with a nominal compound exclamative; "The + N!")
    4- Emphatic inversions
    (with "So..." or "Such...!")
    5- Emphatic use of "Do"
    6- How...!
    (has been mentioned, and rejected, in this thread, as an interrogative (#4 & #6); but it does work as an exclamative)
    (Also, with "How many...!", "How often...!")


    So, the original phrase would be;

    1- She hasn't half brought them here often times in the afternoon...!
    2- Really / Truly, how many times she's brought them here...!
    3- Why / Gosh / OMG, the number of times she's brought them here...!
    4- So many times / So often has she brought them here in the afternoon...!)
    (Such a lot of times has she brought them here in the afternoon...!)
    5- She did bring them in many times in the afternoon!
    6- How many times she's brought them here...!
    (How often she's brought them here...!)


    (*) Informal / vulgar emphasizers
    (these are a bit far in register, but could serve in slang uses)
    (Damn - fuck)
    ('fucking' and its euphemysms; 'freakin'', 'flippin'', etc)

    - How many damn / fucking times she's brought them here...!
    (Damn! (Hell! / Heck!) How many times she's brought them here...!)
    (Fuck! / Fucking! How many times she's brought them here...!)
    (How many Fucking / freakin' times she's brought them here...!)
     
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