Andrzej

  • lady jekyll

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Andrzejek or Jędruś/Jędrek.

    Tom

    Thank you, Tom, for the early reply. I've another doubt: which is the difference of both possibilities that you mention?
    Personally, I have no idea of Polish. I am writing a short story, that takes place during 1940's, in which appears a little polish boy. And I would like to offer a tender image from him.


    Thank you again.
     

    mcibor

    Senior Member
    I would say, that family, especially mum would call him Jędruś (it's more childish)

    But friends would call him Jędrek.

    Andrzejek would call him his good, female, older teacher

    Hope this doesn't bloat the overall image ;)
     

    lady jekyll

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    I would say, that family, especially mum would call him Jędruś (it's more childish)

    But friends would call him Jędrek.

    Andrzejek would call him his good, female, older teacher

    Hope this doesn't bloat the overall image ;)

    Thank you, mcibor. Now I have a clear idea of the different possibilities of the diminutive form. I was looking for "Jedrus" (I can't type it correctly with my keyboard). But may be I use the other ones, too, depending on the context.
     

    kknd

    Senior Member
    polski / Polish
    Speaking of old times: I should bear in mind that when referring to somebody, calling for somebody's attention one has to use vocative; especially when we are talking about educated people in 1940's but I think not only. This should be true for everyone about then...

    So his friends could use vocative of Jędrek, which is Jędrku ('Jędrku, could you do me a favor?', but 'Where is Jędrek?'). Similar with Jędruś: it's vocative form is Jędrusiu and Andrzejek with vocative Andrzejku.

    Hope this will help you to maintain the zeitgeist. :)
     

    lady jekyll

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Speaking of old times: I should bear in mind that when referring to somebody, calling for somebody's attention one has to use vocative; especially when we are talking about educated people in 1940's but I think not only. This should be true for everyone about then...

    So his friends could use vocative of Jędrek, which is Jędrku ('Jędrku, could you do me a favor?', but 'Where is Jędrek?'). Similar with Jędruś: it's vocative form is Jędrusiu and Andrzejek with vocative Andrzejku.

    Hope this will help you to maintain the zeitgeist. :)

    It's been an significant contribution. Very interesting. And very different from the languages I know.
    Ok, then if Jedrus's father calls him, he says: Jedrusiu, come here!

    Certainly, I've to learn Polish. It's beautiful!!
    Thanks, kknd! It helps me a lot because I want to mantain the zeitgeist!

    Oh! One more and last question: if a german friend from this polish child refers to him and doesn't knows this language differences, it's would be normal that he says always Jedrus to him. Or not?
     

    mcibor

    Senior Member
    hmm, to say the truth Andrzej, Jędrzęj, Jędrek or Jędruś are too hard for Germans to pronounce...
    The German counterpart is Andreas, but the real name would be something in between...
    Anyone?
     

    BezierCurve

    Senior Member
    if a german friend from this polish child refers to him and doesn't knows this language differences, it's would be normal that he says always Jedrus to him. Or not?

    I bet he/she wouldn't use vocative. And I suppose he/she would use the easier to pronounce form - Jędrek / more affect.: Jędruś, which probably would sound like [jendrek] / [jendrush].
     

    lady jekyll

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Thank you very much.
    If you imagine the situation, ok? Both children are five years old:
    The german boy asks for example: What's your name?
    Andrzej answers: Andrus (because his parents call him so).
    Up to then, the german boy will refer to him even 'Jendrush' as it sounds.

    So in my text I have to write correctly Jendrus when 'the autor' refers directly to the boy, and Jendrush when it do it the German ones. I am correct?

    Thanks again.
     

    BezierCurve

    Senior Member
    Correct forms (with diacritics):

    Andrzej / Jędrzej,
    diminutive: Andrzejek / Jędrzejek / Jędrek / Jędruś,
    and what would a German friend probably call him: Andreas / Jendrek / Jendrusch.

    Note, that the German "j" is pronounced like English "y", and that Polish "ę" sounds more less like "en". "Ś" is not really pronounced as German "sch", but that's the best way you could write it in German, hence "Jendrusch".

    The form you mentioned (Andrus) would probably sound funny to Polish ears at that time, as it was used (at least in central Poland) more as a nickname - for a disobedient boy.
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    I can imagine someone using Andruś, it has a nice folksy tang about it.

    Tom
     
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