Angry that the dazzling brightness of the electric light had made sleep unthinkable

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ida2

Senior Member
Persian - Iran
Hello,

In the bold part of the following context, don’t you think some words are missing? The sentence sounds somewhat vague.

He died in his sleep, aged sixty. At the time Duniya had the twins at her breasts. His voice, thick, mumbled something like, “Do you mind if we switch off the light?” just before he was called away by death. In retrospect she regretted not asking if the jinns had dismounted briefly, letting him see. Otherwise why ask that she turn off the lights? She was in the rocking-chair, breast-feeding her two hungry monstrosities, and anything she said would have sounded awkward. Angry that the dazzling brightness of the electric light had made sleep unthinkable, she turned to say something. But he expired before she managed to speak her piece. A fortnight later she was on a plane to Mogadiscio.

Source: Gifts, written by Nuruddin Farah
 
  • ida2

    Senior Member
    Persian - Iran
    No words are missing, and the sentence is not vague. What do you find vague about it?
    Let me paraphrase the sentence and you see if I am right.

    She was angry with the fact that how he could sleep in such brightness.

    Is it correct?
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    No, it is not correct. The bright lights had made sleep unthinkable: that is, sleep could not be imagined; sleep was impossible. Beyond that, it isn't a sentence, but is instead an adjectival phrase.
     
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