Ann backbites Cameron.

tufguy

Senior Member
hindi
I would like to know about the word "backbite" and its use. Here are few example sentences.

1) Ann backbites Cameron.

2) Ann backbites about Cameron.

3) Ann is backbiting Cameron on this matter.

4) Ann is backbiting Cameron about this matter.

5) Ann is backbiting about Cameron on this matter.
 
  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Here are few example sentences.
    There are only 2 examples, one transitive and one intransitive. None are idiomatic and none give any context.

    The verb "to backbite" is rare - backbite is normally used as a noun "There has been a lot of backbiting at the meeting of Mr Modi's Cabinet."
    or as an adjective
    "She never speaks well of anyone - she's the backbiting sort of person who will speak nicely to your face but tell everyone that you are useless."

    If you ever find a real example, e.g. from a newspaper or book, please use it and ask again.:thumbsup:
     

    tufguy

    Senior Member
    hindi
    There are only 2 examples, one transitive and one intransitive. None are idiomatic and none give any context.

    The verb "to backbite" is rare - backbite is normally used as a noun "There has been a lot of backbiting at the meeting of Mr Modi's Cabinet."
    or as an adjective
    "She never speaks well of anyone - she's the backbiting sort of person who will speak nicely to your face but tell everyone that you are useless."

    If you ever find a real example, e.g. from a newspaper or book, please use it and ask again.:thumbsup:
    If we have to say "someone backbites about someone" then what do we need to say? I mean you are saying it is not usually used as a verb but how about this kind of direct sentences? There must be a way to say this.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    We do not know what you mean when you say 'backbite about' so how can we tell you how to express your idea correctly?
    What was Ann doing or saying to Cameron? We always need context. You must think of a situation and explain it to us. We have dozens of words that might be whatever you mean, but we aren't mind-readers.
     

    tufguy

    Senior Member
    hindi
    We do not know what you mean when you say 'backbite about' so how can we tell you how to express your idea correctly?
    What was Ann doing or saying to Cameron? We always need context. You must think of a situation and explain it to us. We have dozens of words that might be whatever you mean, but we aren't mind-readers.
    Ann is very good with Cameron but whenever she is not around Ann makes slanderous statements about her.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    I thought 'Cameron' was a man's name either first name or even a disliked man being referred to by his surname.
    Of course it is derogatory - wouldn't it be in your culture?

    Ann talks about Cameron behind his/her back, but she flatters him/her (when) face-to-face/ to his face. She's a hypocrite.

    You see, it is not difficult when you give us a context and explanation! :)
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    When we "talk about someone behind their back", this is gossiping or sometimes scandal-mongering. "Did you know that the new girl Gloria is going out with that good-looking sales manager? - What, the one with the wife and five children?" These office workers are not indulging in "backbiting", but they are talking about Gloria behind her back. They may even be genuinely concerned about her.

    It is not necessarily negative in the way that backbiting is spiteful and negative.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Cameron Diaz (for example) is quite definitely a woman
    I can't argue with that, thank goodness! :DBut anyhow how common is it as a female first name, either in the UK or the USA. I just wanted to make sure the right pronoun/possessive was being used.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top