Announcing the Dictionary of English Collocations on WR

  • Pablo Peligroso

    Senior Member
    Great addition, your brand continues to improve.

    On another note (lalalaaaa) is there any chance you will ever sell a downloadable dictionary - say, one like Spanish-English? The reason I ask is because other dictionaries are downloadable and installed on the local machine (like Black's Law Dictionary) and this makes it possible to work off line. Working off line becomes a big deal when no hot spot is available and the lookups are much faster and easier compared to a physical dictionary. Sooooo, any chance of such an animal in the future?
     

    mkellogg

    Administrator
    English - US
    a downloadable dictionary
    It is fairly easy for a technical person to extract all the content of those downloadable dictionaries and put it up on their own web server outside of the law. I've worked hard to build content like the collocations and don't want it to be stolen quite so easily. So, no, no plans for that.
     

    L'irlandais

    Senior Member
    Ireland: English-speaking ♂
    Hi,
    I love the collocations dictionary. I often recommend it to my students. However frequently find that my specific word (from my English lessons) isn’t listed. DearPrudence asked earlier if it were possible to make suggestions, additions to the list. I can’t find a link to do so.
    Suggestion arising from a discussion thread today;
    A blithering idiot/blathering on
     

    jann

    co-mod'
    English - USA
    DearPrudence asked earlier if it were possible to make suggestions, additions to the list. I can’t find a link to do so.
    Suggestion arising from a discussion thread today;
    A blithering idiot/blathering on
    I think you could click the "is something missing?" link at the bottom of the "idiot" Collocations entry to suggest adding "a blithering idiot" to the list of "idiot" collocations. You could then append your suggestion about having a separate entry for blither/blather at the same time. :)
     

    mkellogg

    Administrator
    English - US
    I love the collocations dictionary. I often recommend it to my students. However frequently find that my specific word (from my English lessons) isn’t listed.
    Glad you like it! We are quite proud of our work with this one.

    Our coverage of words is fairly good, but "blather/blathering" isn't common enough for us to have worked on it. If this "dictionary" gets as much usage as we want it to, we will eventually add that word.
     

    FeminaBrandao

    New Member
    English
    Hi everybody,

    I am excited to announce that we now have a "dictionary" of English collocations on WordReference.com.

    Collocations are words that tend to go together. You commit a crime, take a shower (at least in the US). You might be "raised on a farm". Sometimes languages are difficult and it is difficult to find the right adjective to go with a noun or use the language in an idiomatic way. This work is our attempt to make it easier to find this information.

    I am quite proud of our work here and hope it will be a great and invaluable resource for people, especially those learning English and trying to express themselves well.

    Mike

    "I took a peek" and am offering thoughts: Great for those learning or teaching English or for new writers! Congratulations - Impressed. And am wondering, are or how are the collocations related to the distinct sense of space (time) in each language? I mean, is this helpful only for an English speaker writing in English? Or would there need to be guidelines provide for say a native speaker of Hindi who is writing using English for Special Purposes? And as I recently heard from a colleague there that English for Special Purposes is a very important way of approaching English, how can the speaker or writer of English (used for all purposes or monolingually) relate to the Special Purposes speaker or writer with the least cultural/cognitive gaps?
    Lois
     

    Sakalela

    New Member
    English UK
    Hi,

    I haven't looked closely but I hope a distinction is made between US and other varieties of English. I have noticed in Canada that the use of prepositions is at best, erratic and seemingly random. For example in the UK one arrives at or in. In Canada people say arrive to, which, to my ear, is completely incorrect.
     

    Chevere33

    Senior Member
    English, midwestern US
    Hi,

    I haven't looked closely but I hope a distinction is made between US and other varieties of English. I have noticed in Canada that the use of prepositions is at best, erratic and seemingly random. For example in the UK one arrives at or in. In Canada people say arrive to, which, to my ear, is completely incorrect.

    Yes! Or geographical regions. It about drives me nuts when people say, "Next on line" but I know that many in the US say it that way. Or "I'm excited for this weekend" (I only say, "excited about".)
     

    mkellogg

    Administrator
    English - US
    Awesome. How can we enter suggestions? I'm thinking of "throw a fit" or "have a tantrum".
    Glad you like it. :) There are plenty of terms, phrases and expressions that are missing. We did what we could and are hoping to see it become useful to enough people that it makes financial sense to expand it to more terms and languages.
     

    WildWest

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    I came across this thread as I was about to open a new one to express publicly how thankful I am to the developers of the collocations dictionary, and jumped in without hesitation.

    I have recently discovered and began using it although I have regularly consulted WR Dictionary for years for definitions and synonyms. Dictionaries that adress collocations are rare on the Internet, and that of WR is an excellent work.

    It is extremely helpful. Great job, guys! Keep up the good work!
     

    CecilStan

    New Member
    English - United States
    Glad you like it. :) There are plenty of terms, phrases and expressions that are missing. We did what we could and are hoping to see it become useful to enough people that it makes financial sense to expand it to more terms and languages.

    is the order of the collocations based how frequently they appear in english?. eg. for "take" i see

    1. take the [money, bribe, offer, proposal]
    2. take a [shower, bath, phone call]
    3. etc...
    did you get some huge collection of texts and basically find that "take .. money/offer" appears more often than "take .. shower/bath"?...i know a collocation is inherently a frequently used phrase but just want to figure out relative to the other how common a collocation is...i guess knowing how you came up with the list would be helpful.
     
    Last edited:

    mkellogg

    Administrator
    English - US
    The order is based on a combination of highest-usage first, but we have grouped similar collocations.

    i guess knowing how you came up with the list would be helpful.
    We just looked at usage of phrases that use the term and tried our best to include everything that we consider important to know. We left out anything that we consider somewhat rare usage. Always remember that we did it from our perspective and that we can't cover everything 100%. We tried to cover US and UK usage, but I'm sure that we missed some slang usage or usage common in Canada or Australia. Overall, though, it should be a good, somewhat concise listing of "collocations" for each term.

    I hope that helps!
     

    Heredianista

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Hi everybody,

    I am excited to announce that we now have a "dictionary" of English collocations on WordReference.com.

    Collocations are words that tend to go together. You commit a crime, take a shower (at least in the US). You might be "raised on a farm". Sometimes languages are difficult and it is difficult to find the right adjective to go with a noun or use the language in an idiomatic way. This work is our attempt to make it easier to find this information.

    I am quite proud of our work here and hope it will be a great and invaluable resource for people, especially those learning English and trying to express themselves well.

    Mike

    That sounds like a remarkably useful resource for non-native English speakers!

    Is there any plan to make Spanish collocations available as well? (I know there are fewer in Spanish, but there are still a lot of details to keep straight about which words properly go together.) Thanks!
     

    L'irlandais

    Senior Member
    Ireland: English-speaking ♂
    Hi Mike,
    Do you have a Patreon account? While nobody makes a living from having one, perhaps Spanish members might like to contribute to the development of a Collocations in their language. By which I mean, not creating the resource until the overall cost has been contributed. Just a thought, I have no idea of the ins and outs of what to do when it becomes obvious folks won’t put there hands in their pockets to pay the entire amount necessary for the development of such a resource.
     

    mkellogg

    Administrator
    English - US
    Do you have a Patreon account?
    I have considered doing something like that to fund development, but so far, I have decided against it. In this case, it could make sense if we could find enough people who would be interested. Currently, though, I only see a few requests, not a flood of people who would donate a substantial sum because it would help them with their work.
     

    A.Ramakrishna

    New Member
    Telugu
    Your efforts are praiseworthy.For one to acquire mastery of any language , being knowledgeable as to how a word is collocated with is most necessary .
     

    boom boom boy 25

    New Member
    English - Canada
    Hi everybody,

    I am excited to announce that we now have a "dictionary" of English collocations on WordReference.com.

    Collocations are words that tend to go together. You commit a crime, take a shower (at least in the US). You might be "raised on a farm". Sometimes languages are difficult and it is difficult to find the right adjective to go with a noun or use the language in an idiomatic way. This work is our attempt to make it easier to find this information.

    I am quite proud of our work here and hope it will be a great and invaluable resource for people, especially those learning English and trying to express themselves well.

    Mike
    cool
     
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