annoying beyond the extra trouble

SuprunP

Senior Member
Ukrainian & Russian
I say "theoretically" because almost nobody actually takes the time and trouble to look something up these days. We are always in a hurry despite how much time we have. We have a strong need to press on with or without the necessary information. Fuzzy understanding seems to always be preferred over delay or loss of continuity - detours are fundamentally annoying beyond the extra trouble they cause.
(My Big T.O.E.; T. Campbell)

Would you be so kind as to explain to me what exactly is meant here?

Is it close to the following:

The extra trouble they cause is annoying, but detours also have some fundamental, intrinsic annoyance (which is unrelated to anything else, let alone to the extra trouble they cause).

Thanks.
 
  • Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Hi Suprun,

    You've waited long for an answer. I'll have a go for you.

    I think this is a loose use of fundamentally. I don't think he's saying more that we don't do things which cause extra trouble, and this is why we avoid looking things up - to look something up he sees as a detour causing extra trouble.

    As someone who spends a significant fraction of his life looking things up, I find it hard to agree.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    He's making a metaphor comparing a task to a journey. He thinks the idea of being forced to go a different way that you had planned is annoying whether it is any extra trouble or not.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I think "intrinsically" is a better word than "fundamentally" for this sentence.

    I read mostly from a tablet that allows instant word look up. I have a pretty good vocabulary so I don't use the look up often but I find it handy.

    I am now reading paper edition book. I came across a word I did not know the exact meaning for. I put my finger on the word :) but no definition came up. I just continued reading. I figured that I had a good understanding of what was going on, and looking up the word from an external source was more effort than it was worth.

    So what is the decision making process? On the tablet, a no brainer--a simple tap of the finger and the definition is revealed without losing your place in the book.

    Elsewhere, an effort. Is that effort required to understand what you are reading? If not, I plow on.
     

    Joseph A

    Senior Member
    Kurdish
    Hello everyone,
    Could you please tell me why native speakers of the English language regard "I troubled you." as unnatural English? Instead, they prefer "I bothered you.".
    Here, by "I troubled you,", I mean "I disturbed you." When someone does me a favor, I appreciate their help by saying it instead of "I bothered you.".
    PS. I googled it and got the definition in that sense, but I wonder why it seems unnatural to natives.
    Regards,
    Joseph
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    We do say "Sorry to trouble you" or "Sorry for having troubled you" to convey the meaning of interrupting or disturbing somebody, but it's almost in the nature of a set phrase.

    Outside of that,
    "I troubled you" or "He/it troubled me" would tend in most contexts to convey the meaning of causing anxiety or worry. So that's probably why we wouldn't generally use it to mean just disturbing what somebody was doing.
     

    Joseph A

    Senior Member
    Kurdish
    We do say "Sorry to trouble you" or "Sorry for having troubled you" to convey the meaning of interrupting or disturbing somebody, but it's almost in the nature of a set phrase.

    Outside of that,
    "I troubled you" or "He/it troubled me" would tend in most contexts to convey the meaning of causing anxiety or worry. So that's probably why we wouldn't generally use it to mean just disturbing what somebody was doing.
    Thanks a lot, DonnyB.
     
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