...answers are much nearer being right than others.

godwill

New Member
Korean
In the C.S. Lewis's Pure Christianity, there is the following sentence.

As in arithmetic—there is only one right answer to a sum, and all other answers are wrong: but some of the wrong answers are much nearer being right than others.

It is difficult to understand the phrase 'much nearer being right than others'. I think 'nearer' requires 'to something', but it is followed by 'being right'. Please let me know how this expression works.
 
  • heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    You are right when you say 'nearer' requires 'to something', and in this case the 'something' is (the state of) 'being right'.

    Some answers are closer to the correct answer than others. eg if we take the sum 10 + 8, 17 is 'much nearer being right', (or is closer to 18) than 21.
     

    godwill

    New Member
    Korean
    Thank you for your quick reply. Then can I also insert 'to' next to 'nearer', i.e., 'much nearer to being right than others'?
     
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