Antes de / Antes de que / Antes que

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zstevensclay

Member
English
I understand that the infinitive follows antes de.

I understand that the subjunctive follows antes de que/antes que.

I don't understand when to use antes de instead of antes de que/antes que.

Hay alguien que pueda explicarlo claramente y directamente? Hay un montón de confusión en los foros sobre esta pregunta por lo que veo. Si pudieran me darían una respuesta sencilla y al punto.

Muchisimas gracias
 
  • chamyto

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Antes de hacer los deberes/antes de que hagas los deberes, ayúdame con este ejercicio.

    Antes de=infinitivo.
    Antes de que=subjuntivo.

    ¿Alguna duda al respecto?
     

    zstevensclay

    Member
    English
    Creo que lo entiendo.

    1)Antes de estamos hablando de un hecho innegable.

    2)Antes de que no estamos seguro de que vaya a pasar la acción, y todavía la acción no sucedió.

    ?Verdad?
     

    donbill

    Senior Member
    English - American
    I understand that the infinitive follows antes de.

    I understand that the subjunctive follows antes de que/antes que.

    I don't understand when to use antes de instead of antes de que/antes que.

    Hay alguien que pueda explicarlo claramente y directamente? Hay un montón de confusión en los foros sobre esta pregunta por lo que veo. Si pudieran me darían una respuesta sencilla y al punto.

    Muchisimas gracias
    Se usa antes de con un sustantivo o un infinitivo:

    antes de comenzar / antes del comienzo
    antes de comer /antes de la comida

    Se usa antes que / antes de que con un verbo conjugado (en subjuntivio):

    antes (de) que comieran
    antes (de) que salgan
    antes (de) que hubieran empezado
     

    zstevensclay

    Member
    English
    Se usa antes de con un sustantivo o un infinitivo:

    antes de comenzar / antes del comienzo
    antes de comer /antes de la comida

    Se usa antes que / antes de que con un verbo conjugado (en subjuntivio):

    antes (de) que comieran
    antes (de) que salgan
    antes (de) que hubieran empezado
    Thank you, but I understand that as per my thread.

    What I do not understand is WHEN to use antes de versus antes que. What situations call for each usage. Can you explain that please?
     

    donbill

    Senior Member
    English - American
    Thank you, but I understand that as per my thread.

    What I do not understand is WHEN to use antes de versus antes que. What situations call for each usage. Can you explain that please?

    Antes de is not followed by a conjugated verb. It is followed only by an infinitive or by a noun.

    Niño, lávate las manos antes de comer.
    Hay que estudiar mucho antes de la prueba.
    Siempre leo un poco antes de acostarme.

    Antes (de) que is always followed by a conjugated verb. The 'de' is usually considered optional.

    Antes que te cases, mira lo que haces. (refrán)
    Raúl va a limpiar el piso antes (de) que lleguen los invitados.
    Todo el mundo se había marchado antes (de) que comenzara/comenzase la tormenta.
     

    chamyto

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Antes de is not followed by a conjugated verb. It is followed only by an infinitive or by a noun.

    Niño, lávate las manos antes de comer.
    Hay que estudiar mucho antes de la prueba.
    Siempre leo un poco antes de acostarme.

    Antes (de) que is always followed by a conjugated verb. The 'de' is usually considered optional.

    Antes que te cases, mira lo que haces. (refrán)
    Raúl va a limpiar el piso antes (de) que lleguen los invitados.
    Todo el mundo se había marchado antes (de) que comenzara/comenzase la tormenta.
    You´re right, Donbill. Maybe the use of using or not "de" depends on the region you are. I must admit I use it 99% of the time.
     

    zstevensclay

    Member
    English
    Thank you donbill your posts are thoughtful, complete, and helpful. And I believe I understand the concept basically. Maybe this is a better way to express the problem for me from my perspective.

    Why can't you say for example?

    Nino lavate las manos antes de que comas.
    Antes de casarte, mira lo que haces.
    Raul va a limpiar el piso antes de llegar los invitados.
    Todo el mundo se habia marchardo antes de comenzar la tormenta.


    I believe the reason why only one of the two option is correct, (antes de/antes de que/antes que) is because in one case (antes de) we are using a noun or we are talking about something someone is in a habit of doing or certainly will do. In the second case (antes de que/antes que) we are talking about something which is uncertain. Is this the correct way to determine whether we will use either 1)antes de or 2) antes de que/antes que?

    Gracias

    Espero que me haya explicado bien.
     

    chamyto

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Thank you donbill your posts are thoughtful, complete, and helpful. And I believe I understand the concept basically. Maybe this is a better way to express the problem for me from my perspective.

    Why can't you say for example?

    Nino lavate las manos antes de que comas.
    Antes de casarte, mira lo que haces.
    Raul va a limpiar el piso antes de llegar los invitados.
    Todo el mundo se habia marchardo antes de comenzar la tormenta.
    You got it, all of them are fine, but I´d use antes de que lleguen/antes de que comenzara in the two last sentences, and "antes de comer" , in this case maybe because it´s a general action, not a particular action (I mean, you will probably have dinner with your family).

    Wow, I must admit that I cannot explain clearly the reason to use one or another, thanks Donbill.
     
    Last edited:

    donbill

    Senior Member
    English - American
    Thank you donbill your posts are thoughtful, complete, and helpful. And I believe I understand the concept basically. Maybe this is a better way to express the problem for me from my perspective.

    Why can't you say for example?

    Nino lavate las manos antes de que comas. (There is no change of subject here. When that's the case, there's no need to add a clause with a conjugated verb. So we say, 'lávate las manos antes de comer.')
    Antes de casarte, mira lo que haces. (This will work. It's simply a different way to express the same idea.)
    Raul va a limpiar el piso antes de llegar los invitados. (A new subject, 'los invitados', has been introduced. We add 'que' to begin the new clause with a conjugated verb.)
    Todo el mundo se habia marchardo antes de comenzar la tormenta. (The same as for the previous statement. 'La tormenta' will be the new subject of the clause introduced by 'que'.)


    I believe the reason why only one of the two option is correct, (antes de/antes de que/antes que) is because in one case (antes de) we are using a noun or we are talking about something someone is in a habit of doing or certainly will do. In the second case (antes de que/antes que) we are talking about something which is uncertain. Is this the correct way to determine whether we will use either 1)antes de or 2) antes de que/antes que?

    Antes (de) que is always followed by the subjunctive. At least that's the prescriptive rule. It has nothing to do with habit or lack thereof.
    Siempre charlábamos un rato antes de que llegara el profe. That's a habitual occurrence, but we have to use subjunctive because we use antes de que and we use antes de que because the subject of the second clause is not the same as that of the first clause.

    Gracias

    Espero que me haya explicado bien.
     

    donbill

    Senior Member
    English - American
    Un servidor.

    Look here. Enter 'antes' and click 'consultar': http://buscon.rae.es/dpdI/

    There's a lot of information and many examples of the use of 'antes' in combination with 'de' and 'que'. Note, near the end of the entry for 'antes', that 'antes que' can express preference ('rather than') in certain contexts.
     
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