anticipated revolution

flowersophy

Senior Member
Chinese-China
Hi,

I cannot figure out what "anticipated revolution" mean in the following passage (From Nicholas Handers' The Posteverything Generation):
Jameson calls it “Pastiche”–“the wearing of a linguistic mask, speech in a dead language.” In literature, this means an author speaking in a style that is not his own – borrowing a voice and continuing to use it until the words lose all meaning and the chaos that is real life sets in. It is an imitation of an imitation, something that has been re-envisioned so many times the original model is no longer relevant or recognizable. It is mass-produced individualism, anticipated revolution.

Does it merely mean "a revolution which is expected but hasn't occurred yet"? I think this expression might indicate something else according to the context.

Thanks very much!
 
  • Cardinal101

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Hi flowersophy - Interesting... I notice that the phrase "anticipated revolution" is closely placed to the phrase "mass-produced individualism." This gives me the idea that maybe "anticipated revolution" means a revolution that is mass-produced, pre-packaged, and "given" to the masses (the people). Not much of a "revolution" at all? By the way, your definition makes perfect sense too! :)
     

    siares

    Senior Member
    Slovak
    Both "anticipated revolution" and "mass-produced individualism" are oxymorons.

    Edit:
    I think the passage is being non-complimentary about words in postmodern writing. The author does not have his/her own personality, is a fake. Anticipated revolution is something like 'planned spontaneity'. It implies lack of substance, and insincerity.
     
    Last edited:

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I'm inclined to share Parla's view here, but "anticipated revolution seems to have something to do with a sentence in the next paragraph:

    "But how do we rebel against a generation that is expecting, anticipating, nostalgic for revolution?"
    The previous generation is anticipating a revolution (by the writer's generation). A revolution is anticipated (expected to happen) by the older generation.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top