Antonym of sleepy/drowsy

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tphuong122002

Senior Member
Vietnamese Vietnam
Hi my friends!

<< Outside the scope of these forums. >>

By the way, could you tell me what is the right antonym for sleepy and dozy? For example: After a long and tiring drive in the night, I drank a cold Coke to get ...... (an adjective that means less sleepy and dozy) to continue my driving. What adjective should this be?

Many thanks!
 
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  • mtmjr

    Senior Member
    English (US)
    Personally, I have similar trouble finding a good antonym website. Usually I just google "antonym" and use whichever sites come up. I would keep in mind, however, that not all words have direct antonyms, and sometimes their antonyms are inappropriate for the situation.

    As for your sentence, I would restructure the section in question:

    After a long and tiring drive in the night, I drank a cold Coke to wake myself up/give myself a boost/energize myself in order to/so that I could continue (my) driving.

    Also, I would eliminate "my", but that's just my preference. I can't think of a good adjective that fits this usage; I guess the best one I can think of is "energized". This would have to be followed by "enough", but even then, it sounds awkward to me.
     

    tphuong122002

    Senior Member
    Vietnamese Vietnam
    Many thanks, mtmjr and Forero, for your help. I know how to put it with a verb, but I want to find an adjective-antonym. Do you recommend any?
     

    mtmjr

    Senior Member
    English (US)
    Honestly, I don't think it would be idiomatic to use an adjective here, namely since I cannot think of a single appropriate adjective for this use. As I said, the adjectives that would work (energized/stimulated/vitalized...) sound absolutely misused and awkward. As far as I know, a native English speaker would use a verb in this circumstance.
     

    jucami

    Senior Member
    USA (English)
    I agree with forero's suggestion of "alert." And like forero said, I would also say "to keep me alert" or "to stay alert" or "to remain alert" - I would not say "to get alert," as in your original sentence. It would sound unusual. Also, maybe you could say "to get re-energized."
     

    mtmjr

    Senior Member
    English (US)
    I have to say I do like "re-energized". But if you are going to use it in the sentence, I would first change the "to" to "and":

    After a long and tiring drive in the night, I drank a cold Coke to get re-energized and continue (my) driving.
     
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