Antonyms of "free (doesn't cost money)"

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JLanguage

Senior Member
USA: American English, Learning Hebrew and Spanish
His services aren't free.
His services cost money.
His services are available for a fee.

I'm really looking for antonyms belonging to a formal register, because colloquially you can always use "costs money" or "isn't free".

The gala dinner isn't free = ?

Thanks,
-Jonathan.
 
  • JLanguage

    Senior Member
    USA: American English, Learning Hebrew and Spanish
    Only thing I've found so far is "paid", but it doesn't fit. The person who figures this one out is the official Wordmaster.
     

    Jana337

    Senior Member
    čeština
    Jonathan, does it have to be an adjective? Or, to put it better, does it have to fit in the sentence "The gala dinner is ..."?

    I only have semi-absurd ideas like "you will incur a cost", "is at a charge".

    Jana
     

    JLanguage

    Senior Member
    USA: American English, Learning Hebrew and Spanish
    Jana337 said:
    Jonathan, does it have to be an adjective? Or, to put it better, does it have to fit in the sentence "The gala dinner is ..."?

    I only have semi-absurd ideas like "you will incur a cost", "is at a charge".

    Jana
    Not that specific sentence, it could fit in a sentence with a similar meaning. Another similiar sentence : The services provided to the homeless were not free of charge. Of course this is a negative construct, not a positive one.
     

    nycphotography

    Senior Member
    American English
    You have: available for a fee
    That's good.

    Posssibly: available at additional charge.
    that may be slightly better depending on circumstances.

    Alternatively, you could consider:
    His services are available for $75/hr.
    Which is way too direct for mere mortals.

    <shrug>
     

    JLanguage

    Senior Member
    USA: American English, Learning Hebrew and Spanish
    riglos said:
    Why not simply "The gala dinner is charged"?

    Mara.
    Because charged is incorrect in your sentence. It can only mean:
    1: of a particle or body or system; having a net amount of positive or negative electric charge; "charged particles"; "a charged battery" [ant: uncharged]
    2: fraught with great emotion; "an atmosphere charged with excitement"; "an emotionally charged speech" [syn: supercharged]
    3: supplied with carbon dioxide [syn: aerated] 4
    4: capable of producing violent emotion or arousing controversy; "the highly charged issue of abortion"
    From: WordNet ® 2.0, © 2003 Princeton University
     

    James Stephens

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    It is common on announcements of commercial receptions to include the notation: A cash bar will be available or simply, Cash Bar. This, of course, means every thing else is free. If you are writing an announcement or an invitation to a gala dinner that the guests could reasonably assume to be free, Try something like Tickets will be available at the door. Tickets are now on sale in the lobby. In the cases of a register (I am sure what kind of register is meant), you may make the notation, Standard rates apply; Fee for Service is used to describe a kind of medical plan, but may it may also be appropriate for use here.
     

    JazzByChas

    Senior Member
    American English
    Hmmmm...

    "The gala/reception requires each member's/attendee's contribution.." (or donation...)

    or...

    "The gala/reception requires the support of the members, (or attendees)..."

    [Note: "dinner" is not in the register you seek, either (pronounced, "eye-ther";) ]
     

    bartonig

    Senior Member
    UK English
    JLanguage said:
    His services aren't free.
    His services cost money.
    His services are available for a fee.

    I'm really looking for antonyms belonging to a formal register, because colloquially you can always use "costs money" or "isn't free".

    The gala dinner isn't free = ?

    Thanks,
    -Jonathan.
    His services are free.
    His services are remunerable.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    River's suggestions sound great to me.

    Alternatively, in the description of the Gala Dinner, simply insert the price:
    "... on Tuesday at 8:00pm there will be a Gala Dinner ($50) ..."

    ... or, if this is a conference or similar event, there is a place on the registration form where all charges are listed (unless everything else is free). That's where the price of the Gala Dinner would be listed.
     
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