anxiety make me drag into disaster

  • Placeinthesun

    New Member
    Korean
    No, I'm sorry: it doesn't make sense.

    Could you explain in other words what you want your sentence to mean?
    I would like to express that sometimes anxiety can drag people into disaster.

    I was wondeing whether the sentence makes sense.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    It's possible that you mean "Don't let anxiety drag me into disaster". You have given no context - context means telling us in simple words about the situation or idea. I think that feeling extremely worried can make people do very foolish things, resulting in something worse than whatever was worrying them before.
     

    Placeinthesun

    New Member
    Korean
    It's possible that you mean "Don't let anxiety drag me into disaster". You have given no context - context means telling us in simple words about the situation or idea. I think that feeling extremely worried can make people do very foolish things, resulting in something worse than whatever was worrying them before.
    There is no context because it popped up in my mind while I was reading a book.

    Thank you very much anyways :)
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Don't make anxiety make me drag into diaster.

    This is a negative imperative sentence. You are telling someone (or expressing a hope?) not to force/allow anxiety to make you drag (something) into disaster. It makes no sense.

    I would like to express that sometimes anxiety can drag people into disaster. Is this your own phrasing, or is it what you read in the book? It isn't common to talk of being "dragged into disaster".


     
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