any cake left that is intended for a surprise.

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Oswinw011

Senior Member
Chinese
Suppose today is sister's birthday. This morning I went outside and bought her a big birthday cake. After dinner on this special evening, I go to the refrigerator to fetch my cake, which is to serve as a big surprise for my sister. But upon opening the fridge door, I find the cake lost. So I search around and finally find it in the doghouse. The dog almost eats it all! 1.There is scarcely any cake left that is intended for a surprise.
2.There is scarcely any cake that is intended for a surprise left.
3.There is scarcely any cake--that is intended for a surprise--left.

Hi,
Are there any correct highlighted phrases? Thanks.
 
Last edited:
  • Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    We wouldn't combine that information in one sentence that way. Even if we make it grammatically correct, it's not idiomatic.
    There is scarcely any of the birthday cake left. It was supposed to be a surprise.
    (You went out (to a store). The area around your home is outside. The cake is gone, not lost. The dog has almost eaten it all.)
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    The cake, which had been intended as a surprise,
    You can't talk about it in the present tense, as though it still existed.

    You might also use "the cake, which was intended as a surprise..."


    The dog's eaten nearly all of it. Now there's hardly anything left of the cake that had been intended as a surprise.

    (crossposted)
     

    Oswinw011

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    (You went out (to a store). The area around your home is outside. The cake is gone, not lost. The dog has almost eaten it all.)
    :thumbsup: I don't know went outside can mean that. Why is it gone rather than lost?
    The dog's eaten nearly all of it. Now there's hardly anything left of the cake that had been intended as a surprise.
    Neat :thumbsup: Thank you. But I guess this one is grammatical but less idiomatic as Myridon said, right?
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Waiting till the very end of the story to add an minor detail is just not good story telling.

    The dog's eaten nearly all of it. Now there's hardly anything left of the cake that had been intended as a surprise. My sister's name is Susan. It was a Tuesday. I was wearing a blue shirt.The end. ;)

    You didn't lose the cake, it was taken.
     

    Oswinw011

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    If we told stories in the manner Inception and Memento all the time, those movies wouldn't be interesting. Those are very much exceptions, not the rule. If you spent as much time thinking about your original question as you spend debating the answers, you might not need to ask the question. ;)
    Yes, I know that. I'll delete it later. Just a whimsical idea off the top of my head.
     
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