any longer / no longer / any more / not anymore

matt_fr

New Member
France
Y a t-il une différence entre any more et anymore?
Si oui quand utilise t'on l'un ou l'autre?
Merci d'avance !

Note des modérateurs : nous avons fusionné plusieurs discussions pour créer ce fil.
Pour Not anymore! comme réponse en soi, voir
Not anymore.
 
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  • Txertudi

    Member
    English & Euskera
    Hi,

    It is generally agreed that anymore is an adverb, though some people use any more in the same way (generally by mistake).

    For example:

    John doesn't work at home anymore. In this sense, it is synonymous with any longer.

    It doesn't rain in March here anymore. Here, it is synonymous with now or any longer (contrasting a previous and current state).

    Any more, on the other hand, features more as a noun implying a greater quantity, and the adjectival any negating that quantity.

    For example,

    No, I wouldn't like any more asparagus, but thank you. In this sense, it is implied that some asparagus has already been had, but that a greater amount (more) is not desired.
     

    Zone

    Senior Member
    France, French
    Hello :)

    Which of the following sentences sounds better (more "English")?

    - You will no longer receive e-mails at this address.
    - You will not receive e-mails at this address any more.

    Is there a difference in meaning or not at all? Is one more common than the other?

    Thanks for any help :)
     
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    dillins

    Member
    England - English
    Hi, firstly just looked in the dictionary; the word "anymore" doesn't exist so I'm left to assume that it is two words (like it says in my English-French dictionary)

    Secondly, if you want to sound professional I would use the first one, however if you just wanted to say it in general conversation I would probably say "You won't get any e-mails any more" or "I won't send you any more e-mails"

    Hope this helps!
     

    Alipeeps

    Senior Member
    UK
    UK - English
    Anymore definitely does exist and is distinct in meaning from "any more".

    Anymore veut dire "ne... plus" - as in "je ne fume plus" - "I don't smoke any more/I have stopped smoking." It relates to the concept of time.

    "Any more" veut dire plutôt "encore de" - as in "Est-ce qu'il ya encore de bonbons?" - "Are there any more sweets?/Are there any sweets left?" It relates more to the concept of quantity.

    Your examples above actually perfectly illustrate the two meanings:

    "You won't get any e-mails anymore" - means "From this point in time, you won't receive emails."

    "I won't send you any more e-mails" - means "I won't send you any further emails (any more than what I have already sent)". If you said "I won't send you emails anymore" it would change the meaning slightly to mean "From this time onwards, I will not send you any emails."
     

    radiohead87

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    They're both correct and are just about equal, but I would actually say that "no longer" is just the tiniest bit more formal than "anymore" (or "any more"... both are correct). And that's interesting that you hear Americans say "no longer" more often... I personally say "any more" more often! Just depends on personal preference though.
     

    radiohead87

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    According to Webster's, "anymore" and "any more" can be used interchangeably in the sense of "no longer". However, if you wanted to use it in the sense "Est-ce qu'il y a encore de bonbons?" you would need to then spell it as two words: "Is there any more candy?"
     

    Alipeeps

    Senior Member
    UK
    UK - English
    Well it's in my (UK english) Collins Robert French-English dictionnary and I've always seen it spelt as anymore in UK English...
     

    Kelly B

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Please see this English Only thread for a discussion of the difference between these: Anymore or any more?

    British English speakers tend to prefer the two-word version. […]
     
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    dillins

    Member
    England - English
    I think it is more American to use "anymore" as opposed to "any more". "Anymore" doesn't actually exist in the traditional English dictionary. If you don't want to sound American you should use "any more" all the time, however everyone will know what you mean whichever way you say it.
     

    xveronicax

    Senior Member
    English/USA
    Dillins, what traditional English dictionary are you talking about ? Can you point me to a link on the internet so I can check out this dictionary where common words like "anymore" don't exist ? ;-)
     

    xveronicax

    Senior Member
    English/USA
    Lol, I know that "anymore" is more of an American usage -- but it does exist as a real, legit word! Either way, as stated earlier, you may as well just use "any more" all the time as you'll always be understood --- especially if you don't want to sound American...
     

    dillins

    Member
    England - English
    I didn't mean it as an actual dictionary but a way of saying that "anymore" is an American word brought to England, not an English word. Therefore it is not "traditional"
     

    chloax

    Senior Member
    French
    Pouvez-vous me dire quand j'emploie l'un ou l'autre ?

    J'avais écrit : "She doesn't live here any more" et l'on m'a dit qu'il fallait utiliser "any longer" mais je ne sais pas pourquoi.

    Merci pour votre aide

    Chloax
     

    nikkodeparis

    New Member
    français france
    hello,
    je pense que any more renvoie à une notion de quantité tandis que any longer parle d'une durée.. "she used to live here.. but she doesnt any longer.."
    à la différence de " i used to have milk, but dont have it anymore"
    if it helps..
    nikko
     

    Goldsand

    Member
    French
    Bonjour,

    Je n'arrive pas très bien à comprendre la différence entre
    "not any more" et "not any longer" ..

    Pourriez vous me donnez un petit exemple, merci beaucoup pour l'aide.
    Salutation
     

    Oddmania

    Senior Member
    French
    Salut,

    Lorsqu'ils se réfèrent à une durée, les deux sont synonymes. Par contre, il se peut que not any more se rapporte à une quantité (alors que c'est impossible pour not any longer).

    I'm not a child any more ou any longer :tick:
    I don't want any more water :tick:

    PS: Dans le premier exemple, j'ai le sentiment que anymore en un seul mot est bien plus courant, mais je ne suis pas sûr que ce soit réellement correct.
     

    Goldsand

    Member
    French
    Salut,
    merci pour ton example, je vois maintenant ou chercher ...

    donc dans mon cas je peux utiliser les deux ..

    I can't bear this noise any longer.
    I can't bear this noise any more.
     

    moustic

    Senior Member
    British English
    C'est faux, la bonne réponse est A. Les deux sont possibles, mais avec l'ordre imposé (we ... exceed) la réponse ne peut être que A.

    Pour B, il aurait fallu : We don't exceed our income any more.
     

    Michelvar

    Quasimodo
    French / France
    J'ai aussi du mal avec cette distinction, et, personnellement, lorsque une situation n'est plus la même avant et après une date, j'y trouve une notion de temps.

    Pourriez-vous m'expliquer ce que vous appelez "pas de notion de temps", avec quelques exemples (je ne comprends pas vite avec les abstractions :eek: ).
     

    arundhati

    Senior Member
    French - France
    J'avais compris la question comme ceci, dans un dialogue :
    "-We exceed our income.
    - Not anymore."
    Mais si c'est une question "à trou", je suis d'accord avec Moustic.
    Pour la notion de temps, je voulais juste dire que le "focus est ici sur le fait de "dépasser..." ou pas, et non sur la durée du "dépassement".
     

    alexus34

    Member
    FRENCH
    Merci !
    C'etait en effet une question a trou.

    Je suis surpris de la réponse de Moustic car c est la correction qui indique " not any more"
     

    Oddmania

    Senior Member
    French
    Salut,

    Je suis tout à fait d'accord avec Moustic.

    .....We not any more exceed our income :cross:
    .....We no longer exceed our income :tick:
    .....We don't exceed our income any more :tick:
    .....We don't exceed our income any longer :tick:

    Any (+ more, longer,...) s'accompagne toujours de la négation not, qui doit être appliquée à un auxiliaire (comme do). On ne peut pas appliquer la négation directement au verbe exceed et écrire We not exceed our incore anymore (et encore moins We not anymore exceed...).

    Ou alors, ça me fait penser à du très vieil anglais, comme dans A Midsummer Night's Dream de Shakespeare : "Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind".
     
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