any phrase for: not being able to cope with the demanding school work?

CLL

Member
Chinese (Hong Kong)
A: La Salle Primary School is every parent's dream school.
B: But its academic standard is really high. I'm afraid my son is not good enough for this school.

Is there any problem with this expression used in this context? Is there a better way to say: not being able to cope with the demanding school work?

P.S.: I'm asking all these strange questions because I do subtitles translation and I want to make them more idiomatic, rather than sounding "a bit off". Thanks a lot!!!
 
  • tepatria

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    How about "I'm afraid my son couldn't cope."? I would hate to think a parent would say their own child is not good enough for the school, someone else's son perhaps, but not your own child!
     

    bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    I'm afraid my son won't measure up.
    I'm afraid my son won't be able to deal with the pressure.
    I'm afraid my son isn't ready for that or isn't used to that. (This one would be more euphemistic, saying not that the son is inherently incapable, but that he isn't prepared for that type of situation.)
     

    AngelEyes

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    ...but its academic standard is really high. I'm afraid:
    1. my son doesn't quite qualify for acceptance to this school.
    2. my son would have too difficult a time keeping up with the other students.
    These are my suggestions, because I'm not sure if he'd be kept out because he couldn't pass the entrance tests, if his parents just wouldn't want to challenge him to do better, or whether he was just not intelligent enough to do well there.

    Tepatria's correct. American mothers are very sensitive to any negative remarks about their little angels.

    I'd like more context, if you have any.

    AngelEyes
     

    CLL

    Member
    Chinese (Hong Kong)
    Thanks bibliolept, Trisia and tepatria! All your suggestions are really good. I'll probably use "won't measure up" because I need to make it as short as possible (the constraint of doing subtitles).
    I'll remember to give more context the next time when I ask.
     

    CLL

    Member
    Chinese (Hong Kong)
    Hello AngelEyes, thanks for your suggestions.
    We have a different culture here. Chinese mothers don't refrain from making negative remarks about their children.

    The context is like this:
    It's a TV programme (some sort of a documentary) about a family moving home to another district because they want their son to go to their dream school. The mother told the interviewer, "Although this is our dream school, we are not sure if our son can measure up to its high standard."

    These are my suggestions, because I'm not sure if he'd be kept out because he couldn't pass the entrance tests, if his parents just wouldn't want to challenge him to do better, or whether he was just not intelligent enough to do well there.

    Tepatria's correct. American mothers are very sensitive to any negative remarks about their little angels.

    I'd like more context, if you have any.

    AngelEyes
     

    AngelEyes

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    CLL,

    bibliolept's suggestion of "can measure up" is excellent for your purposes. It's casual but not too slangy.

    And American parents would have no problem admitting to themselves their child might experience school problems, but they might be hesitant to admit it on TV.

    And welcome to the Forums. :)

    AngelEyes
     

    CLL

    Member
    Chinese (Hong Kong)
    I'm really glad to have come across this website today (I searched "as good as it gets" in Google and then it led me here). I wish I had known this website earlier; then I might have less grey hair today;)
    You all are really helpful!! :thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:
     
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