any plans <for, of> snooker

pap123

New Member
hindi
is : "any plans for snooker?" a correct sentence?
or "any plans of snooker?" a correct sentence?
 
  • panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    "Any plans for snooker?"
    ... like "Anyone for tennis?"
    ... is an elliptical sentence.

    Depending on context, it may be representing "Have you any plans for snooker?"
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    Hi,

    I asked a friend to be my guest of an English Club; I am the host. The Club ends at noon. I asked her:

    Any plans for afternoon?

    I wonder if this is used correctly.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    "Any plans for this afternoon?"
    "Any plans for the afternoon?"

    Both of those are common. You need "the/this" to say you mean today's afternoon.
     

    Steven David

    Senior Member
    General American English USA - Standard
    is : "any plans for snooker?" a correct sentence?
    or "any plans of snooker?" a correct sentence?

    The correct one is "Any plans for snooker?".

    The reason that it's "for" is that "snooker" uses the plans or "snooker consumes the plans". Without snooker, there are no plans. These are, we could think, "snooker plans". This is why we say, "Any plans for snooker?".

    "Any plans of snooker?" This means, "Are there any plans that come from snooker?" So "plans of snooker" means the plans belong to snooker or come from snooker. This is not the intended meaning here, and therefore this one is wrong.
     
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