Any word that has pure /o/ sound?

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yonh

Member
Korean
Hello.

Are there any English word which has 'pure /o/' sound? I am not talking about 'short o' in 'body' [bɑːdi] or 'long o' in 'owe' [oʊ]. I mean a word that has /o/ sound but no other vowels right before or after it.
For example, a word 'toe' [toʊ] or 'go' [ɡoʊ] have /o/ but it is followed by another vowel /ʊ/, so it is not 'pure /o/'. Another example, 'law' [lɔː] or 'board' [bɔː(r)d] have /ɔ/ which is not exactly /o/. I quoted phonetic symbols from general English dictionaries.
Because I have never heard the 'pure o' sound in English, I want to know if it exists. I'm sorry if this question sounds odd, but I am curious.

Thank you.
 
  • natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Some accents have the pure [o] vowel. Listen to some Scottish accents, for example. You should be able to go to some websites with sound archives.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I am sure there are some styles of pronunciation of English that include the /o/ sound you are asking about.
    For example, on one of the pronunciation sites linked from the resources post at the top of this forum you will be able to hear lots of different pronunciations of simple words - for example home and oak - that I think include /o/. The site includes IPA representation of the spoken form.
    Resources, links and frequently discussed topics (FAQ).
    http://www.lel.ed.ac.uk/research/gs...netics/Englishes/Home/HomeMainFrameHolder.htm
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Some dictionaries use their own phonetic symbols; some use the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA), so I wonder what sound your [o] is supposed to represent. [o] occurs in IPA, but IPA [o] is not one of the phonemes of English, according to two books of mine.
     

    Wandering JJ

    Senior Member
    British English
    I agree with sound shift, IPA [o] is not a phoneme of RP (standard) English in the UK. The closest long vowel we have is, as you indicated, a diphthong: [oʊ].
     

    yonh

    Member
    Korean
    Thank you all for your help. I forgot to check the resources post.
    Some dictionaries use their own phonetic symbols; some use the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA), so I wonder what sound your [o] is supposed to represent. [o] occurs in IPA, but IPA [o] is not one of the phonemes of English, according to two books of mine.
    I prefer IPA because it is consistent in most cases.
     

    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Hello.
    Are there any English word which has 'pure /o/' sound?...
    Because English spelling is not phonetic, there is no pure 'o' sound.

    The 'o' in 'go' is pronounced as a diphthong. The 'o' in 'got' is pronounced as a single sound that does not occur in 'go'.

    Additionally the 'o' in 'got' sounds different in different accents, for example BE and AE.

    The only way to pronounce English vowels correctly is to choose a variety of English and listen to native speakers who speak that way.

    _____________________________________________________________
    Note
    If you want an example that is close to, say, Spanish 'o' (no diphthong) then single syllable words like, odd, pot, dog, etc. are the ones to listen to.
     
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