anyhoo (anyhow)

*Soub*

Member
French, France
Hi all,

Is it appropriate to say this word in the same meaning that "anyway" in a beginning of a sentence, to change the subject of a conversation. I've heard this word many times in the "Scrubs" TV-show, but I don't know if I can use it...

Thank you ;)
 
  • titi82

    Senior Member
    France
    I would qualify the term as playfull. The meaning is the same as anyway, but it's... Let's just say I think your English and understanding of the subtleties of American English have to be near perfect to use it. Maybe a native speaker can be more precise.
     
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    aucomptoir

    Senior Member
    Australia/ English
    I would say yes, go ahead and use it. I have heard a few French people at work say it, and I get the impression it is not that easy to pronounce. PS, I think it's also spelt "anyhoo", even though it's not a real word yet so i guess there is no correct spelling. PPS. I agree with Titi82. It's less formal than "anyway".
     

    PTS

    New Member
    English, UK
    Isn't it a little joke, saying anyhow in a supposedly Canadian accent?
    Like aboot instead of about?
     

    emma42

    Senior Member
    British English
    As far as I know, "anywho/anyhoo" is American or Canadian English. Definitely not British English.

    Edit: Not a joke if one is actually Canadian, as are many of our members, PTS. And welcome to the Forum!
     

    mgarizona

    Senior Member
    US - American English
    Yes, the spelling "anyhoo" makes more sense, as the word being played around with here is 'anyhow,' not 'anyway' ... though in fact both are used in the exact same way, to mean "whatever!"

    'Anyhoo' is strictly played for laughs, and is only usable in an instance where one wants to change the subject, in a laisse tomber kind of way.

    It's a very peurile, ridiculous kind of word, though, so unless you're joking around with close friends, stick with 'anyway' or 'anyhow.'
     

    titi82

    Senior Member
    France
    As far as I know it's american sit-com english. I remember a hysterically funny Friends episode involving a guy that made "mocklate" and "fishtashioes", and said anywho/anyhoo all the time.

    He might have been canadian.... Anywho...

    Thanks Aoyama, nothing like putting something in to practice!
     

    emma42

    Senior Member
    British English
    Ooh, mgarizona, I think we should wait until we hear what the Canadians say before we condemn the word to being "puerile and ridiculous".:eek:
     

    mgarizona

    Senior Member
    US - American English
    Ooh, mgarizona, I think we should wait until we hear what the Canadians say before we condemn the word to being "puerile and ridiculous".:eek:

    I seriously doubt the use of the word in AE has anything to do with Canadian pronunciation.

    It's just a funny sound.
     

    Schmoo

    Member
    English, Canada
    Alright, time for a Canadian's point of view. I am a Canadian woman in my 20s and my friends and I use the word 'anyhoo' occasionally. It's not necessarily a joke, however you probably wouldn't use it in conversation with your boss if you wanted to seem professional or serious.

    Aoyama: yes, one can really use this. I'm not speaking for the British, but I'm fairly certain that if you live in Canada or the United States, you can say 'anyhoo' and not be regarded badly!
     

    emma42

    Senior Member
    British English
    Thank you, schmoo. I was beginning to wonder where all the Canadians were. So we have established that it is used in Canada, but not necessarily in a joking way, but that some Americans think it sounds funny and "sit-comish".
     

    Koneko

    Senior Member
    French
    Bonjour à tous,
    pour anyhoo", auriez-vous des suggestions de traduction ?
    Je partage l'avis de mgarizona sur le fait qu'il sert à indiquer qu'on souhaite changer de sujet. Je n'ai pas de contexte précis ici, mais je me demandais si on pouvait utiliser une tournure comme : "D'accord, mais…", Oui, oui…", "Je comprends…" ou "Je vois, je vois…" et changer de sujet tout de suite. Est-ce qu'on pourrait aller jusqu'à : "C'est bien beau tout ça, mais…", à votre avis ?
    Merci !
     

    wildan1

    Moderando ma non troppo (French-English, CC Mod)
    English - USA
    I wouldn't call anyhoo puerile or ridiculous (or specifically Canadian), but it is folksy--the kind of thing your small-town neighbor might say when chatting with you about nothing special. It sounds more northern than southern to me.

    Its not a word you would use in a formal setting, but its use does not imply a poor education.
     

    Kelly B

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I think so too, north/midwest - Ohio, perhaps?
    D'accord aussi en ce qui concerne son emploi pour changer le sujet, et souvent pour combler une silence. Quand on le dit, c'est souvent aaaaalloooooonnnnngé, mais aussi accompagné d'un petit sourire de complicité.
    My first thought was C'est pas tout ça, mais..., which isn't too far from your own suggestion, but I'm concerned that it's too direct or rude, too.
     
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