Anymore, No more, no longer

gothicpartner

Senior Member
Spanish
Please, could you explain, with some examples, when I should use one instead of other ??

1.-facts which are not anymore true
2.-facts which are no longer true
3.-Facts which are no more true

1.-I don´t smoke anymore
2.-I smoke no longer
3.-I smoke no more

It seems that 1) and 2) are synomymous to me. But my examples are not as good as you should give them

Thanks in advance
 
  • Jeromed

    Banned
    USA, English
    Better (in blue):

    1.-facts which are not anymore true Facts which are not true anymore
    2.-facts which are no longer true :tick:
    3.-Facts which are no more true Facts which are true no more

    1.-I don´t smoke anymore :tick:
    2.-I smoke no longer I no longer smoke
    3.-I smoke no more :tick:

    They all mean the same, for all practical purposes. Here's my take on them:
    1. is what I recommend that you use (in both cases). It can be informal or formal.
    2. is rather formal.
    3. is literary.
     

    LaLoquita

    Senior Member
    American English
    Hola Gothicpartner:
    1.-facts which are not anymore true
    2.-facts which are no longer true
    3.-Facts which are no more true

    1.-I don´t smoke anymore :tick: This is the most common way to say it.
    2.-I smoke no longer :cross: I no longer smoke.
    3.-I smoke no more :cross:

    It seems that 1) and 2) are synomymous to me. But my examples are not as good as you should give them

    Generally speaking, at least in EEUU, we say "don't ___(verb) anymore" more than any other construction. "No longer ____ (verb)" is correct, just more formal-sounding.

    I've got to run right now, but when I get back, I'll see if I can think of any other examples. In the meantime, I'm sure someone else can help as well.

    Saludos, :)
     

    Bilbo Baggins

    Senior Member
    American English
    Please, could you explain, with some examples, when I should use one instead of other ??

    1.-facts which are not anymore true anymore
    2.-facts which are no longer true:tick:
    3.-Facts which are no more true no more Take note: this construction is antiquated and is used poetically.

    1.-I don´t smoke anymore:tick:
    2.-I smoke no longer smoke
    3.-I smoke no more Same as number 3 above

    It seems that 1) and 2) are synomymous to me. But my examples are not as good as you should give them

    Thanks in advance
    There is a certain "feeling" for how to form these types of constructs in English (or any languauge I suppose). They are, of course, governed by certain rules of grammar that I am not familiar with. I just know what sounds right. I would suggest reading as much English as possible. I hope I could help.
     

    gothicpartner

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Yes, the same happens in spanish, one sentence is more formal than the other.:D


    1.-facts which are not anymore true= hechos que ya no son verdaderos
    2.-facts which are no longer true= hechos que no son verdaderos más tiempo
    3.-Facts which are true no more = hechos que no más son verdaderos

    Thanks for making me clear
     

    Jeromed

    Banned
    USA, English
    Yes, the same happens in spanish, one sentence is more formal than the other.:D


    1.-facts which are not anymore true= hechos que ya no son verdaderos
    2.-facts which are no longer true= hechos que no son verdaderos más tiempo
    3.-Facts which are true no more = hechos que no más son verdaderos

    Thanks for making me clear
    Creo que no has entendido. Sólo la primera traducción al español es correcta, y sirve
    para las tres oraciones en inglés.
     

    gianco

    Member
    peruvian spanish
    Yes, the same happens in spanish, one sentence is more formal than the other.:D


    1.-facts which are not anymore true :cross:= hechos que ya no son verdaderos
    2.-facts which are no longer true= hechos que no son verdaderos más tiempo
    3.-Facts which are true no more = hechos que no más son verdaderos

    Thanks for making me clear

    la primera oracion deberia ser
    1.- facts which are not true anymore


    good luck :thumbsup:
     

    elianecanspeak

    Senior Member
    English - EEUU
    2.-I smoke no longer
    3.-I smoke no more
    Hearing these two constructions, I would expect a clause with more information to follow:

    I smoke no longer than fifteen minutes at a time. (comparative quantification)

    I smoke no more than you do. (Do any grammarians know what it is called when a than-clause serves to compare its subject to the subject of the main clause?)

    I smoke no more than five cigarets a day. (comparative quantification)

    The above constructions would be used more frequently in writing, and as LaLoquita points out, in AE at least, we would usually say "I don't smoke any longer than fifteen minutes at a time, etc.
     
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