anyone

< Previous | Next >

azz

Senior Member
armenian
a. It wouldn't be nice to see anyone in that situation, let alone your friend.
b. It wouldn't be wise to take anyone with you, especially an old person.
c. It wouldn't be surprising to see anyone you know in that party, particularly your ex-girlfriend.

Are the above sentences grammatical?

PS. I have asked a question like this one before, but things aren't really clear in my head.
 
  • timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    Mmm, yes c) doesn't work. I'm tempted to go as far as to say it is "ungrammatical". Certainly I can't imagine anyone saying it.
     

    jacinta

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I actually would use someone in both b. and c.

    It wouldn't be wise to take someone with you, especially an older person. To me, older sounds a little more polite than old.
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    jacinta said:
    I actually would use someone in both b. and c.

    It wouldn't be wise to take someone with you, especially an older person. To me, older sounds a little more polite than old.

    Question 1 :arrow: why someone?? It sounds better to me, but I cannot think why?

    Question 2 :arrow: what about "elder"? I am asking this because I NEVER know where to use "elder"!!!!!


    Thank you!!! :p
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    Artrella said:
    Question 1 :arrow: why someone?? It sounds better to me, but I cannot think why?

    Question 2 :arrow: what about "elder"? I am asking this because I NEVER know where to use "elder"!!!!!


    Thank you!!! :p
    In answer to your Q1 I´ve really thought about this and I can´t say why someone works in some of them anyone in others and either in others. I hate to admit defeat so if someone (or anyone ;)) knows please post! I have studied a lot of romance grammar in my time, but not English.

    For Q2 erm, well it´s certainly better to say older person than just an old person. With elder - I think you can use it but it´s not as common. We also use it to make the adjective elderly and the noun elder - for example "the elders of the church meet every Thursday night".

    It´s like farther and further - English is my mother tongue and I´ve never worked out when you use one or the other of these!:D
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    timpeac said:
    It´s like farther and further - English is my mother tongue and I´ve never worked out when you use one or the other of these!:D

    Farther
    :arrow: only for distance

    Further
    :arrow: for distances and also implies addition

    Do you need further explanation?? (NOT* Do you need farther explanation?*)


    Thx Timpeac for your explanation!!! :p
     

    jacinta

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Artrella said:
    Question 1 :arrow: why someone?? It sounds better to me, but I cannot think why?

    Question 2 :arrow: what about "elder"? I am asking this because I NEVER know where to use "elder"!!!!!


    Thank you!!! :p

    Ok, I'll try...
    If I were to use anyone in no.1 (azz's b.), I seem to want to add the word "just".
    It's not wise to take just anyone with you, let alone an older person.
    "Someone" used here tells me "a person". This is VERY difficult to explain. "Someone" just fits better to me :) . They both do work, though!

    As far as elder, older and old: In common speech, I say an older person sounds more polite because I am saying the person is older than I am, not that he is just plain old, putting the person in a category. Elderly is reserved to describe the people in rest homes, IMO. I don't think it is a flattering term to describe my 80 yr. old aunt. I would never call her elderly but she is an older woman, older than me :) Elderly brings an image to my mind of someone tottering with a cane.

    In written text, elder is absolutely fine to use. "The elder Senator from Wisconsin" or the elder Statesman...It is a more formal word used in specific terms. As tim says, it's commonly used as "elders of the church".

    I hope this isn't all too confusing :eek:
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    jacinta said:
    In written text, elder is absolutely fine to use. "The elder Senator from Wisconsin" or the elder Statesman...It is a more formal word used in specific terms. As tim says, it's commonly used as "elders of the church".

    I hope this isn't all too confusing :eek:
    Having read this Jacinta and reflecting on both my church example and those that you give, do you think that here this usage of "elder" is meaning "more senior" which of course does usually mean older!!

    "Senior" itself (if my school Latin serves) was Latin for older so maybe the semantic movement of "older" to "wiser" is common in language:)
     

    azz

    Senior Member
    armenian
    Thank you all.

    I didn't know about further and farther. Thanks Artrella. Actually I only use the first one, which seems to be a safe thing to do.

    As to anyone and someone, I think I had the same problem before and I can't seem to figure out what is wrong. Actually my example was one quite similar to this one.

    c. It wouldn't be surprising to meet anyone you know here.
    is supposed to mean:
    c1. You might meet anyone you know here.

    d. It wouldn't be surprising to meet someone you know here.
    means:
    d1. You might meet someone you know here.

    How about:
    It wouldn't be right to rob anyone (no matter who).
    It isn't right to rob anyone.

    They don't mean the same thing as far as I can see. But maybe someone can see farther!
     

    azz

    Senior Member
    armenian
    Hi Jana,
    But "everyone" means all of them.

    You might mean any one of them.
    doesn't mean:
    You might mean every one of them.
     

    jacinta

    Senior Member
    USA English
    jz337 said:
    OK, but I would use "everyone" in c)

    Jana

    Well, I don't think this would work unless you were in a place where everyone you know would be! I think this is rarely possible :) unless you only know a few people.

    If we put azz's example in context, it will have more meaning:

    I don't want to go to the party.
    Oh, come on! Go! You might meet someone you know there.

    Here, it makes much more sense than to say:
    You might meet anyone you know there.

    You would have to clarify using anyone. Would it mean any one of a thousand people you know?
    I think in normal conversation, "someone" would be the word of choice.

    To end this conversation, I would add:

    I went to the party and I didn't meet anyone I know there. OR:
    I went to the party and I didn't know anyone there.
     

    azz

    Senior Member
    armenian
    Thanks Jacinta,
    You ask:
    Would it mean any one of a thousand people you know?

    Yes, that is exactly what I meant! (Apart from the fact that I don't know that many people. It is more like fifty or something.) But I guess my example doesn't make much sense anyway.

    What if I said:
    It wouldn't be surprising to meet any one of your close friends at that party tonight.

    Does that make sense?
     

    jacinta

    Senior Member
    USA English
    azz said:
    What if I said:
    It wouldn't be surprising to meet any one of your close friends at that party tonight.

    Does that make sense?

    Sure, that's fine. That tells me that you have a lot of close friends and the probability of them (at least more than two of them) being at the party is high. You would need the choice of many to use any.

    Now, if it were me saying this, I would probably say: "It wouldn't be surprising to see (meet) one of your close friends at that party." I'd leave out the any but then, that's me.
    Again, your sentence is fine.
     

    Nick

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    azz said:
    a. It wouldn't be nice to see anyone in that situation, let alone your friend.
    b. It wouldn't be wise to take anyone with you, especially an old person.
    c. It wouldn't be surprising to see anyone you know in that party, particularly your ex-girlfriend.
    I have no problems with any of these sentences. They all seem fine to me.

    azz said:
    It wouldn't be right to rob anyone (no matter who).
    It isn't right to rob anyone.
    Both of these sentences are fine.
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    jacinta said:
    Ok, I'll try...
    If I were to use anyone in no.1 (azz's b.), I seem to want to add the word "just".
    It's not wise to take just anyone with you, let alone an older person.
    "Someone" used here tells me "a person". This is VERY difficult to explain. "Someone" just fits better to me :) . They both do work, though!

    As far as elder, older and old: In common speech, I say an older person sounds more polite because I am saying the person is older than I am, not that he is just plain old, putting the person in a category. Elderly is reserved to describe the people in rest homes, IMO. I don't think it is a flattering term to describe my 80 yr. old aunt. I would never call her elderly but she is an older woman, older than me :) Elderly brings an image to my mind of someone tottering with a cane.

    In written text, elder is absolutely fine to use. "The elder Senator from Wisconsin" or the elder Statesman...It is a more formal word used in specific terms. As tim says, it's commonly used as "elders of the church".

    I hope this isn't all too confusing :eek:

    Jacinta, as regards the first question, I agree with you in that "someone" conveys the idea of "a person being there" ( :arrow: alguien in Spanish >>>No es conveniente llevar a alguien contigo, menos a un anciano )
    If I use "anyone" the idea conveyed by the sentence is more general and it does not denote a person as you said (this would be in Spanish >>> No es conveniente llevar a cualquiera, menos a un anciano).

    So both are correct in my opinion, but the difference in using one or the other is given by the idea it conveys, more general with "anyone" -maybe more detached- and more "human" with "someone".


    Thank you for help me think!!! :p
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top