anything I've ever felt before

sobhan

Senior Member
PERSIAN
But I look down then, I look down at Evie, and I feel a sadness unlike anything I’ve ever felt before crashing over me like a wave, crushing the breath right out of me
Source: The Girl On The Train, Paula Hawkins
I'm confused. Is this sentence different "I’ve ever felt before crashing over me like a wave, crushing the breath right out of me",from this "I feel a sadness unlike anything I’ve ever felt, before crashing over me like a wave, crushing the breath right out of me"
notice to the Comma
 
  • Rhye

    Senior Member
    English - American
    "Before" is included in the phrase "ever felt before" to mean "unlike anything I have felt up until now". So, before, she had never experienced such a sadness, but now she has.

    It is possible to say, for instance, "I felt a sadness unlike anything I'd ever felt, before entering the bedroom." Grammatically, however, that doesn't quite work out in your example (in spite of your suggested movement of the comma).
     
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