anytime is ok=whenever?

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sinkya

Senior Member
Chinese
I don't think "anytime is ok" or "any time is ok" is correct.

What do native speakers say in the situation below?

A: "Let's watch this DVD together. When is good for you?"
B: "Anytime is OK." (I want to say "I don't have any plans for any time of the day, any day of the week, so I'm free always.")

Thank you.
 
  • Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    "Anytime" is not a word; it should be written as two words, "any time."

    You can say "Any time is OK," or "Any time would be fine," or lots of similar things.
     

    sinkya

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    "Anytime" is not a word; it should be written as two words, "any time."

    You can say "Any time is OK," or "Any time would be fine," or lots of similar things.
    Thank you very much, Glenfarclas.

    Sorry, do you mean to say that I should write "any time" as two words, but I can write "anytime" when I use it as an adverb?
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    "Anytime" is not a word; it should be written as two words, "any time."
    I agree with you, but it seems Random House don't:

    an•y•time /ˈɛniˌtaɪm/ adv.
    1. at any time;
      whenever: Come and see me.—When can I come? —Anytime is fine.
    2. without doubt or exception: I can do better than that anytime.
     

    Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    Thank you very much, Glenfarclas.

    Sorry, do you mean to say that I should write "any time" as two words, but I can write "anytime" when I use it as an adverb?

    I said that "anytime" isn't a word, not that it is an adverb. :)

    Some modernist dictionaries contain common misspellings, such as "alright" (actually two words, as "all right"). That doesn't make it advisable to use them in educated companies.
     
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