Apéritif maison de bienvenue

braveheidi

Senior Member
French - Switzerland
Any idea how to translate this into English ?
Context : it is a touristic offer. What is offered is a pre-dinner drink. What the word "maison" implies here is that the guest can't choose what he wants to drink. He is offered a drink, for instance a glass of wine, but he can't choose himself.
To translate : apéritif maison offert à nos hôtes
my own try : selected aperitif offered to our guests. Doesn't seem quite right, though.
 
  • franc 91

    Senior Member
    English - GB
    No I wouldn't say that - welcome used in this way is familier and it means that the guest feels that it's welcome - not the other way round.
     

    braveheidi

    Senior Member
    French - Switzerland
    A welcome drink is offered to our guests before dinner.
    I think I'll go for the "welcome drink". It does convey the meaning I was looking for. And I checked it out on Google and found more than 60 millions search results, so I guess it's ok.

    Thanks to everyone for their inputs.
     

    franc 91

    Senior Member
    English - GB
    I disagree - c'est un contresens - just because it's on Google doesn't mean it's correct. You could say - We welcome you to our hotel and we offer you....
     

    Quaeitur

    Mod'elle
    French
    I agree with franc91 :)

    If you check google, you will realise that the expression is used in the tourism industry in non-English speaking countries ;)

    How about:
    We will welcome you with a house cocktail?
    A complimentary house cocktail will await you upon arrival?
     

    franc 91

    Senior Member
    English - GB
    It is considered welcome by the person who is going to drink it (welcome here is used as an adjective) not by those who are offering it. What you give here is a misuse of English.
     

    braveheidi

    Senior Member
    French - Switzerland
    Are you sure:confused: I mean this is so widespread... I found many occurrences for 'a welcome drink' on native English Web sites with Language set to English and Region set to either United Kingdom or United States in Google's Advanced Search Options. Here's one example: http://www.thamesdinnercruise.co.uk/dinnerpackages.htm
    I totally agree with you. If you search : "welcome drink" uk , you find more than 5 mio search results many of which 100 % british !
     

    pyan

    Senior Member
    English, UK, London
    It is considered welcome by the person who is going to drink it (welcome here is used as an adjective) not by those who are offering it. What you give here is a misuse of English.
    I agree with franc91 :)

    If you check google, you will realise that the expression is used in the tourism industry in non-English speaking countries ;)
    It may be foreign in origin and a misuse of the word, but "welcome drink" is now used in the UK as part of hotel package deals. (So is "welcome toiletries" :(.) My reaction to "welcome" used in this way is negative but I don't object as much as Franc91.

    How about:
    We will welcome you with a house cocktail?
    I like this best :).


    A complimentary house cocktail will await you upon arrival?
    I think this is fine. When I was young I was told that my use of "complimentary" to mean "free" was a misuse of English but I don't think anyone objects now.
     

    braveheidi

    Senior Member
    French - Switzerland
    "complimetary house cocktail" does seem fine too. But what I like with the expression "welcome drink" is that it could be non alcoholic. If I use "cocktail", doesn't it imply that it will be an alcoholic bewerage ?
     

    staticmouse

    Senior Member
    English - British
    "complimetary house cocktail" does seem fine too. But what I like with the expression "welcome drink" is that it could be non alcoholic. If I use "cocktail", doesn't it imply that it will be an alcoholic bewerage ?

    Be careful here! Only use complimentary if your drink speaks to you and tells you how great you look. If you mean it's free, the word is complementary!!

    For me, it's important to keep the word 'house' because it means it's the establishment's own recipe. Also, why not keep 'aperitif'? It's a word we use in English, it can be alcoholic or non-alcoholic and implies it is served before a meal so you don't have to specify lunch or dinner.

    A complementary house aperitif is served to all guests.

    keep it simple!
     

    braveheidi

    Senior Member
    French - Switzerland
    Be careful here! Only use complimentary if your drink speaks to you and tells you how great you look. If you mean it's free, the word is complementary!!

    For me, it's important to keep the word 'house' because it means it's the establishment's own recipe. Also, why not keep 'aperitif'? It's a word we use in English, it can be alcoholic or non-alcoholic and implies it is served before a meal so you don't have to specify lunch or dinner.

    A complementary house aperitif is served to all guests.

    keep it simple!
    OUps ! Spelling mistake ! sorry. Thanks for your input.
     
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