Apartment, flat and PAD

MikeLynn

Senior Member
I read the thread about the difference between the first two words and it was helpful because it did give me a bit better idea about the difference in meaning. I'm just a bit curious where the word PAD belongs. Is it AmE, BrE, both or too slangy to be used in either of them. Thanks for your advice and expamles.
M&L
 
  • MikeLynn

    Senior Member
    Than you bibliolept, that was pretty quick. Thanks a lot for you explanation, I assume it is the flexibility and informality of the expression that makes the difference...or am I completely wrong?
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Biblio's definition is spot-on. However the word has a slightly dated feel in BE; the up-to-the-minute equivalent is gaff
     

    MikeLynn

    Senior Member
    Thanks a lot ewie for your contribution to this thread. It feels a bit dated as I leaned it while listening to old be bop tapes. Just wonder how dated it sounds in AmE and, if you don't mind, would dwelling be an approximate formal or archaic equivalent of pad? Thanks a lot for your help
     

    jamesjiao

    Senior Member
    New Zealand English and Mandarin Chinese
    It's used a lot more often by younger people in my knowledge
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Ooh, dwelling sounds very formal/official/legal to me, Mike.
    But it's a handy one for when you can't quite decide whether someone lives in a hut or a shanty or similar, or you don't want to offend them by using those words.
     

    PMS-CC

    Senior Member
    "Pad" is certainly less formal than "dwelling" (or "domicile" or "single family residence" for that matter). The term is still used in AmE, especially in the "bachelor's pad" construction. It does have a certain age to it, though; among my social set, the speaker would probably bounce their eyebrows as if they were making a pass at the listener.

    When using the word "pad," wide lapels are optional.
     

    MikeLynn

    Senior Member
    Well, thanks a lot, I sort of knew that, probably the most universal word to express this idea is place-Let's meet at my place, meaning where I live, it might be an apartment, a house, a castle or any other place where I live. The issue now is pad versus dwelling as words have different "colors" that non-natives cannot "see". How would you describe the difference between these two. The minute I have something that's "comprehensible" to the slow brain of mine, I promise not bother you anymore :)
    M&L
    I guess I really feel how difficult these thing can be as every now and then I get asked similar things about Czech and, although I've been a native speaker of the language for almost 45 years, I must admit that I don't have a clue about all those why's and how's. Either they sound right or they don't, but please, give it a shot and it'll be appreciated
     

    MikeLynn

    Senior Member
    We've already mentioned that "pad," while dated, is informal, while "dwelling" sounds very formal, more suited to a census report, police report, or legal contract.
    So, let me rephrase it: although the expression has been here for quite a time it's still used, but it's limited to formal and/or legal register.
    Do you think this "color" would work as irony or sarcasm it used in the right context with the right intonation?
     

    bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    I might use it with a supercilious tone if I wanted to make fun, for whatever reason, of a person's modest home.
    For example, if I wanted to, cruelly, make fun of a homeless person, I might refer to the box, alley, or doorway in which they sleep as their "domicile" or "dwelling." That would be one (distasteful) example.

    I suppose I might also use it to describe a friend's place if he keeps it in poor repair or if it looks like a pigsty.
     

    jamesjiao

    Senior Member
    New Zealand English and Mandarin Chinese
    "Pad" is certainly less formal than "dwelling" (or "domicile" or "single family residence" for that matter). The term is still used in AmE, especially in the "bachelor's pad" construction. It does have a certain age to it, though; among my social set, the speaker would probably bounce their eyebrows as if they were making a pass at the listener.

    When using the word "pad," wide lapels are optional.
    Bachelor's pad is certainly used here in NZ, and I just confirmed with my pal from UK that it's used there too.
     

    MikeLynn

    Senior Member
    Well, bibliolept, that's darn close to what I meant. Thanks a lot. I guess I'd dare say no more questions to be asked here .
    Thanks a lot everybody, you've been a great help
    M&L
     
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