apiece/each one/each

lapot

Senior Member
Hello. Can anyone tell me if these sentences are ok?

They just announced the rewards on the TV for the convicts. $1000 apiece.
They just announced the rewards on the TV for the convicts. $1000 for each one.
They just announced the rewards on the TV for the convicts. $1000 for each.
They just announced the rewards on the TV for the convicts. $1000 each.
They just announced the rewards on the TV for the convicts. $1000 each one.

I just want to know which are the correct ones.

Thanks in advance!
 
  • lapot

    Senior Member
    Thanks sandpiperlily!

    What is the reason for the last one to be wrong? I don't see the difference between the last two.

    Any help would be appreciated! Thanks! :)
     

    sandpiperlily

    Senior Member
    I'm not a grammar expert, so maybe someone else can explain this to you better, but here's how I see it. The final part of the sentence contains three parts: the price ($1000), the connector (for), and the number (one, each). The word "each" can be used in several different ways.

    To me, "apiece" means "for each one."
    "For each one" is fine.
    To me, "for each" implies "each one," based on my understanding of the meaning of the word "each." It's not the prettiest way to say it, but it makes sense.
    Similarly, "each," used this way alone, means "for each one." "$X each" is a common way to express "each one costs $X."

    But "each one" sounds strange, because it feels like it's either redundant or leaving something out. You need the "for" or to remove the "one." If I read this, I would automatically assume that the writer was not a native English speaker, because I think of "each one" as a stereotypical error that English-learners make.

    Do you ever get that weird feeling where if you stare at a common word too long or think about it too hard, it suddenly seems foreign and strange? You've just made me feel that way about the word each!
     
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