Apologise

Camaris

New Member
Australia
Hi Everyone,

I couldn't find this one already posted, so I apologise if I have missed it.

I am trying to work out how to say sorry in Russian, in a romantic context:

ie I'm sorry, I never meant to hurt you.

Any suggestions would be appreciated.

(It's for a novel I'm writing).

Thanks!
 
  • Lev Yakupov

    Member
    Russia/Russian
    Good day Camaris,

    A common translation would be like this:
    Извините, я никак не хотел(а) вас обидеть. - Polite form.
    Or
    Извини, я никак не хотел(а) тебя обидеть. - For well-known person or friend of speaker.
    An (а) ending should be added if speaker is girl.
    English original: I'm sorry, I never meant to hurt you.

    More privacy and as you say more romantic variant is something like:
    Прости, я никак не хотела тебя обидеть. - addressed by (from) girl
    Прости, я никак не хотел тебя обидеть. - addressed by (from) boy
    English original: Forgive me, I never meant to hurt you..

    Also you can add dear or darling adjective after Прости:
    дорогой - addressed to boy;
    дорогая - addressed to girl.

    So finally mine apologize example addressed by boy to his girlfriend:
    Прости, дорогая, я никак не хотел тебя обидеть...
    English original:
    I'm sorry, darling, I never meant to hurt you...
    or
    Forgive me, darling, I never meant to hurt you...
    .
     

    Camaris

    New Member
    Australia
    Hello Lev :)

    Thankyou for taking the time to reply to my question and for your excellent answers. I was wondering, though, if I could ask one more favour.

    Would it be possible for you to provide the english translations of each of the variants, so that I can see how they differ? This will help me decide which one is best. Also, what do they look like in a Roman alphabet?

    If you don't have time, I understand. What you have given me is still very helpful and I appreciate it.:)

    Thanks,
    Camaris
     

    cyanista

    законодательница мод
    NRW
    Belarusian/Russian
    Hello Camaris,

    why don't you offer more context? There can be other variants of translation as well but without knowing the situation a translator is groping in the darkness.:)

    One more possible version would be:

    Прости, я не хотел(а) причинить тебе боль.

    This sounds romantic and refers to seriously hurting someone's feelings whereas Lev's translation implies having offended/insulted someone. But what exactly do you need?

    There's a difference as to whether a man or a woman utters these words (you've probably noticed by now:D) so that's important to know too.

    To Lev: что-то не нравится мне это "никак", я бы сказала "никоим образом" или "вовсе", в зависимости от ситуации, а еще лучше обошлась бы без них ;)
     

    Lev Yakupov

    Member
    Russia/Russian
    Oh, Cyanista, thanks!

    Вовсе and никоим образом is exactly what I tried to remember :eek:

    Camaris, if you about to use this examples with russian context, please replace никак with them ;) The meaning & original sentence remains the same, but sounds much better.

    Прости, я не хотел(а) причинить тебе боль.
    This sounds romantic and refers to seriously hurting someone's feelings whereas Lev's translation implies having offended/insulted someone.
    Yes, yes, yes there it is. I think Cyanista variant more suitable :)
     

    Ralf

    Senior Member
    German
    Well, Lev, you beat me for a few minutes. Nevertheless, I will leave my post beacuse of the transliterations. I hope I'm correct with it.
    Camaris said:
    ...
    Would it be possible for you to provide the english translations of each of the variants, so that I can see how they differ? This will help me decide which one is best. Also, what do they look like in a Roman alphabet?
    ...
    I hope Lev wouldn't mind my stepping in here ;). All of Lev's suggestions do pretty much mean the same: "I'm sorry, I never meant to hurt you"--with the first version conveying a more formal undertone in the sense of "excuse me please" or "please don't blame me":
    Lev said:
    (1a) Извините, я никак не хотел(а) вас обидеть. - Polite form.
    (1b) Извини, я никак не хотел(а) тебя обидеть.
    (1a) IzvenIt(i)e, Ya neekak ñe khot(i)El(a) vas obyd(i)edh.
    (1b) Izvenee, Ya neekak ñe khot(i)El(a) teb(i)A obyd(i)edh. (please note: caps are stressed; "I" is actually spoken as "ee"; "kh" denotes a uvular guttural sound; "ñ" is pronounced just like in Spanish; and the "(i)" is almost mute)
    (1a) is used to adress a person whom you normally would adress to with Mr, Mrs, Ms, Sir ... while (1b) is used when adressing to a friend.

    The second version is more colloquial, almost romantic ("(Please) forgive me, I never meant to hurt you". (The Russian version is actually without "please".)
    Lev said:
    Прости, я никак не хотела тебя обидеть. - addressed by (from) girl
    Прости, я никак не хотел тебя обидеть. - addressed by (from) boy
    Prastee meñA, Ya neekak ñe khot(i)El(a) teb(i)A obyd(i)edh. The ending (a) is necessary when the speaker is female.

    In his third version Lev simply added an endearment to emphasize an intimate undertone: "Forgive me, darling/dear/honey ..., I never meant to hurt you ...".
    Lev said:
    Прости, дорогая, я никак не хотел тебя обидеть...
    Prastee, dorOgaya (dorogOy when adressing to a male person), Ya neekak ñe khot(i)El(a) teb(i)A obyd(i)edh.

    Please note, it always matters if speaker and/or interlocutor are of male or female gender im Russian.

    Another question to Lev: Your Russian translations literally means "... I never wanted to hurt you". What about using намереваться instead of хотеть to get a bit closer to the "meant to" construction? ... I'm afraid it would sound a bit stilted in Russian, wouldn't it? (Just curious ;))

    Ralf
     

    cyanista

    законодательница мод
    NRW
    Belarusian/Russian
    Ralf said:
    Prastee, dorOgaya (dorogOy when adressing to a male person),
    Ralf

    Do you really pronounce it that way? :) I'm afraid it should be somewhat different: daragAya, or even better d@r@gAya (where @ is a schwa vowel). And, correspondingly d@r@gOy.

    Ralf said:
    Another question to Lev: Your Russian translations literally means "... I never wanted to hurt you". What about using намереваться instead of хотеть to get a bit closer to the "meant to" construction? ... I'm afraid it would sound a bit stilted in Russian, wouldn't it? (Just curious ;))

    Ralf

    You can safely use "хотеть" for "mean to". намереваться is not wrong but would sound unnatural.

    Sorry Lev, I answered a question meant for you again!:eek: But I'm sure you'll have something to add;)
     

    Camaris

    New Member
    Australia
    Thankyou everyone for being so helpful :)

    To give you the context, I'll give you a brief outline. An English guy falls for a Russian girl (who speaks English fluently btw)...he is trying to learn Russian to be romantic but often stuffs it up. It isn't major part of the story, just one of those little details to add to make things a bit more detailed.

    This particular phrase is after they have a had a big fight and he is trying to get back in her good graces.

    I hope you all realise that now that you have helped me once I may become a pest as I keep writing. :p

    One small question, when you have the a in brackets, what cyrillic character should I use? Sorry if it is obvious.
     

    Lev Yakupov

    Member
    Russia/Russian
    Ralf, thank you very much!
    Your comments and transliteration is actually what Camaris wanted to get, and what I forgot to post :)

    cyanista said:
    You can safely use "хотеть" for "mean to". намереваться is not wrong but would sound unnatural.
    Sorry Lev, I answered a question meant for you again! But I'm sure you'll have something to add
    Thanks again for quick response ;) Oh I've nothing to add, except that намереваться rarely used in spoken language, while in law it widely spread.

    One small question, when you have the a in brackets, what cyrillic character should I use? Sorry if it is obvious.
    If speaker is male write '' (nothing :) ) instead of (a) and just a if it is a female.
     
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