'Apologize in advance for something' or 'Apologize for something in advance'

< Previous | Next >

Maharaj

Senior Member
Bundeli, Hindi, Urdu, Marathi
Context: A teacher was asking his students to attempt all questions of a paper/exam which they generally don't do so he asked them to train themselves like terrorists to bear this thing in their mind. He however said 'I'm sorry to use terrorists as example'. One of the students objected to this thing to which another student i.e. me replied:

Which of the following sentences is grammatically correct:
1. He has apologized for it in advance.
2. He has apologized in advance for it.

Further am I correct in using 'it' instead of 'that'?

PS: Question edited to include context, I'm sorry to have not provided it in the original post, you see I'm a new user.
 
Last edited:
  • heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Welcome to the forum. :)

    Who is 'the person'? Do you mean that he or she apologised for saying 'terrorists' instead of 'soldiers' in a speech or something?



    (Note 'sth' is not a word in English.)
     

    Maharaj

    Senior Member
    Bundeli, Hindi, Urdu, Marathi
    Welcome to the forum. :)

    Who is 'the person'? Do you mean that he or she apologised for saying 'terrorists' instead of 'soldiers' in a speech or something?



    (Note 'sth' is not a word in English.)
    Thank you, sth = something, I'm a new user I want to know the rules of forum, could you refer me to some?
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    Which of the following sentences is grammatically correct:
    1. He has apologized for it in advance.
    2. He has apologized in advance for it.
    They are both grammatically correct but neither is appropriate in this context because he did not apologise in advance. He apologised after doing what he apologised for. (Not that it needed an apology, in my opinion.)

    If he had said "Sorry for my choice of word, but I want you to train like terrorists", you could call that an apology in advance because he apologised before doing the thing that he apologised for.

    Further am I correct in using 'it' instead of 'that'?
    Yes. But in this situation, you just need "He's apologised" or "He's already apologised".

    I'm a new user I want to know the rules of forum, could you refer me to some?
    Go to the home page of the English Only forum (click on the second "English Only" at the top where it says Forum English Only English Only) and you'll find a pinned thread at the top with rules.
     
    Last edited:

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Ah, that's much better! Thank you!

    Context: A teacher was asking his students to attempt all questions of a paper/exam which they generally don't do so he asked them to train themselves like terrorists to bear this thing in their mind. He however said 'I'm sorry to use terrorists as example'. One of the students objected to this thing to which another student i.e. me replied:

    Which of the following sentences is grammatically correct:
    1. He has apologized for it in advance.
    2. He has apologized in advance for it.
    You don't in fact say that the teacher apologised for using the word terrorist before he said it. I suppose he said something like "Attack the exam paper as if you are ... and I'm sorry to use this word ... 'terrorists'".
    But that's hardly 'apologising in advance', it's just apologizing as he said it.
    The response to the objection would probably be 'He did apologize for saying terrorists'. That's using 'did' for emphasis.
    I don't think you need 'in advance' and you don't need 'it' or 'that' either.
    If you have to have one or the other I think 'that' would be better than 'it' but that's style not grammar.
    You need to get your tense right : if he apologised after saying it, it's more likely to be present perfect.
    If he apologized before or when he used the word we would use the simple past.
    Forum rules are pinned threads at the very top of the front page, above the most recent threads, along with useful tips.
    Welcome! :)
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    To answer the question as asked:
    Which of the following sentences is grammatically correct:
    1. He has apologized for it in advance.
    2. He has apologized in advance for it.

    Further am I correct in using 'it' instead of 'that'?
    I think either would work. I personally prefer (2), although I would replace "in advance" with "already" as has been suggested (posts #9 & 10)

    Since "it" refers to the remark, which has already been mentioned in the conversation, I think it sounds OK: "that" just adds extra emphasis and is perhaps better from a stylistic point of view. :)
     

    Maharaj

    Senior Member
    Bundeli, Hindi, Urdu, Marathi
    They are both grammatically correct but neither is appropriate in this context because he did not apologise in advance. He apologised after doing what he apologised for. (Not that it needed an apology, in my opinion.)

    If he had said "Sorry for my choice of word, but I want you to train like terrorists", you could call that an apology in advance because he apologised before doing the thing that he apologised for.


    Yes. But in this situation, you just need "He's apologised" or "He's already apologised".


    Go to the home page of the English Only forum (click on the second "English Only" at the top where it says Forum English Only English Only) and you'll find a pinned thread at the top with rules.
    Thank you. He actually used the same sentence "sorry for my choice.."
     

    Maharaj

    Senior Member
    Bundeli, Hindi, Urdu, Marathi
    Ah, that's much better! Thank you!



    You don't in fact say that the teacher apologised for using the word terrorist before he said it. I suppose he said something like "Attack the exam paper as if you are ... and I'm sorry to use this word ... 'terrorists'".
    But that's hardly 'apologising in advance', it's just apologizing as he said it.
    The response to the objection would probably be 'He did apologize for saying terrorists'. That's using 'did' for emphasis.
    I don't think you need 'in advance' and you don't need 'it' or 'that' either.
    If you have to have one or the other I think 'that' would be better than 'it' but that's style not grammar.
    You need to get your tense right : if he apologised after saying it, it's more likely to be present perfect.
    If he apologized before or when he used the word we would use the simple past.
    Forum rules are pinned threads at the very top of the front page, above the most recent threads, along with useful tips.
    Welcome! :)
    Thank you, I'm sorry again my teacher did apologize in advance he said "sorry for my choice of words but I want you to train like terrorists" I've had all my doubts cleared without framing the question correctly in the first place :)
     

    Maharaj

    Senior Member
    Bundeli, Hindi, Urdu, Marathi
    To answer the question as asked:I think either would work. I personally prefer (2), although I would replace "in advance" with "already" as has been suggested (posts #9 & 10)

    Since "it" refers to the remark, which has already been mentioned in the conversation, I think it sounds OK: "that" just adds extra emphasis and is perhaps better from a stylistic point of view. :)
    Thank you :)
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top