Apology Accepted

namlan

Banned
Vietnam
A: Sorry for that.
B: Your apology is accepted / Apology accepted.

- Did I use the right two clauses here "Your apology is accepted"? and "Apology accepted" :)

Thanks a lot!

NamLan
 
  • NHHL

    Senior Member
    Singapore-English
    - When you don't accept someone's apology, you will say these, correct?

    "Apology unaccepted" "Your apology is not accepted"

    Thanks very much!
     

    scooch2007

    Member
    English - US
    "Your apology is not accepted" is the only way I have ever heard it, but it is not very common for someone in America to blatantly say that an apology is not accepted.
     

    Qaz_

    Senior Member
    American English
    Not that I have heard it used before, but, to say apology unaccepted indicates to me that you had at one point accepted an apology and for some reason changed your mind and revoked it.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    But when someone says "Apology accepted", it's just an ellipsis. The whole version would be: "The apology has been accepted", am I right?
    Like here:
    - I'm sorry I yanked your ears.
    (.......)
    - Apology accepted.

    (Who Framed Roger Rabit, movie)
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    Hi Greyfriar. But the original implies the passive voice, so, strictly speaking, it should be "has been accepted", shouldn't it?
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Hi Vik
    I see it as an abbreviated form of "Your apology is accepted" rather than "... has been accepted" - but yes, it's definitely passive.
     
    Last edited:

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    Hi Loob, the reason why I used a perfect form of 'accept' instead of "is accepted" is that I hadn't found the adjective 'accepted' with this meaning.
    The verb 'accept' = "to say 'yes' to an offer or invitation",
    but the adjective 'accepted' = "generally believed or recognized to be valid or correct"
    :confused:
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Sorry, Vik, I should have filled in the gaps:eek:

    What I meant was that I see the dialogue as being in the present tense, not in the present perfect.

    So I see the "underlying" answer to I'm sorry I yanked your ears as:
    {active} I accept your apology. -> {passive} Your apology is accepted.

    rather than:
    {active}
    I have accepted your apology. -> {passive} Your apology has been accepted.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    Sorry, Vik, I should have filled in the gaps:eek:

    What I meant was that I see the dialogue as being in the present tense, not in the present perfect.

    So I see the "underlying" answer to I'm sorry I yanked your ears as:
    {active} I accept your apology. -> {passive} Your apology is accepted.

    rather than:
    {active}
    I have accepted your apology. -> {passive} Your apology has been accepted.
    Yes, that's what I don't completely understand in what has been written above in this thread:eek:.
    Why is the present simple used if a situation is specific?
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    It's because "accept" is a 'performative verb': if you say "I accept" you are also performing the action of accepting.
    It's like "apologise" - if you say "I apologise", you are, simply by virtue of saying those words, actually performing the act of apologising.

    The majority of verbs don't work like this: if you say "I run", you're not actually performing the act of running. But those that do work like this are often used in the present simple:
    I apologise.
    I accept.
    I resign!
    I hereby sentence you to five years' imprisonment.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    Thank you!
    (and shame on me, I didn't know about performative verbs:D, I just knew that some verbs are not used in the progressive)
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Ouf, Vik, there's no shame in that - 'performative verb' is a fairly arcane concept:D.

    Also: I didn't mean to imply that verbs like "accept" or "apologise" can't be used in the continuous tenses - they definitely can be. You can, for example, have dialogues like:
    A: What's she doing?
    B1: She's accepting his proposal of marriage.
    B2: She's apologising for not accepting his proposal of marriage.


    It's just that if you use them in the continuous tenses, they stop being 'performative'.

    If you say "I apologise" then you are performing the act of apologising.
    If you say "I am apologising", you are describing what you are saying; you are not actually performing the act of apologising.
     
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