Apology (I'm sorry)

shaloo

Senior Member
English
Bonjour à tous !

I would like to know the way you apologise in your language and also how you would handle it if someone said sorry to you.

Like in Telugu :

I'm sorry = Nannu Kshaminchu- informal
Nannu Kshaminchandi- formal


Its okay = Parvaa leydu

And in French

I'm sorry = Je suis désolée

Its okay = Ce n'est pas grave/ Pas grave/ Ca va

Dhanyavaad !!:) (that means "thank you")
 
  • parakseno

    Senior Member
    Romanian, Romania
    In Romanian you would say

    I'm sorry = Îmi pare rău! / Îmi cer scuze!
    It's OK = Nu e nici o problemă! / E în regulă! / Nu-i nimic (less formal)
     

    betulina

    Senior Member
    català - Catalunya
    In Catalan, you could say (probably among others!):

    I'm sorry: Ho sento / Perdona / Em sap greu (some slight difference of use, depending on the context)

    It's okay: No passa res / Tranquil (male) - tranquil·la (female)
     

    Necsus

    Senior Member
    Italian (Italy)
    Hi, Shaloo.
    I had opened a thread for you about this topic in Italian-English Forum, but I'll answer to you here too.

    To express apology ([I'm] sorry) in Italian we can use:
    - scusa(mi)/(mi) scusi/scusate(mi)
    - domando/chiedo scusa
    - perdonami/mi perdoni/perdonatemi
    - domando/chiedo perdono
    - ti/la/vi prego di scusarmi/perdonarmi
    - mi dispiace
    - sono spiacente
    - sono mortificato
    - sono desolato
     

    Bienvenidos

    Senior Member
    USA
    English
    Afghan Persian (Farsi)

    Sorry: Bubukhshí (single person, informal)
    Bubukshín (mulitple people, formal, singular person, formal)
    Literal Translation: You forgive [me]

    It's okay: Hírus

    Bien
     

    robbie_SWE

    Senior Member
    Trilingual: Swedish, Romanian & English
    betulina said:
    In Catalan, you could say (probably among others!):

    Em sap greu

    Strange! In Romanian "greu" means hard.

    Swedish:

    Sorry: "Förlåt (mig)!" or "Ursäkta mig!"
    It's OK: "Det är OK" or "Det gör inget"

    ;)
     

    Etcetera

    Senior Member
    Russian, Russia (St Petersburg)
    In Russian:
    Sorry = Извини!/Извините! (Izvini!/Izvinite!) or Прости!/Простите! (Prosti/Prostite). The first forms in these pairs are used when you're saying that to your friend ar a child, they shouldn't be said to a stranger, your teacher, and so on. In general, the suffix -те in the imperative stands for polite forms.
    You can also say, Прошу прощения! (Proschu proscheniya), but it sounds a bit more formal.
    It's OK = Ничего (Nichego), Все в порядке (Vsyo v poryadke).
     

    linguist786

    Senior Member
    English, Gujarati & Urdu
    hmm.. i'm sure there's more than one way of saying it in Hindi, but here's one:

    (Sorry) - Maaf karnaa (lit. "forgive (me)")
    (It's OK) - Koi baat nai (lit. translation for that would be .. weird. Almost like "No talk" - meaning "don't talk about it" typa thing)
     

    Brazilian dude

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    In Portuguese:
    Sorry: Desculpe/Desculpa, Perdão
    It's okay: Não foi nada, Não se preocupe/Não te preocupes.

    Brazilian dude
     

    AndREA22

    Senior Member
    ESPAÑOL MEXICO
    Spanish:
    Sorry: Disculpa, disculpe, disculpame, lo siento, perdón, perdoname.
    It's ok: No hay problema, no te preocupes, no se preocupe, no hay cuidado.
     

    panjabigator

    Senior Member
    Am. English
    Hindi:
    Mujhe maaf karo. Mujhe KShama karo.
    मुझे माफ़ करो. मुझे क्षमा करो
    The word KShama is Sanskritic and deritives of it are used in Telugu (see Shaluu's post above) and in Bangla.

    Urdu:
    Mujhe mu'aaf karo (you would never hear kshama)
    مجھے محاف کرو

    note: maaf and mu'aaf are pronounced the same way. Sometimes though, Urdu speakers may say it with a bit of a "u" sound though, but both ways are fine. The word, I believe comes from Arabic, and when transliterated, an appostrophe is used to denote the use of the arabic letter "ain."

    Panjabi:
    Menu muaaf karo. Menu khimma karo.
    ਮੈਨੂੰ ਮੁਆਫ਼ ਕਰੋ. ਮੈਨੂੰ ਖਿੱਮਾ ਕਰੋ.

    Shaloo, what is it in Tamil and Kannada?
     
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    badgrammar

    Senior Member
    American English
    All I remember in Turkish is "üzgünüm" (I'm not even sure you need the umlauts) and "kusurma bakma" (which means "please do not see/look at my faults). But I think there are lots of other ways to say it.

    As always, I humbly await your corrections... :)
     

    Maja

    Senior Member
    Serbian, Serbia
    In Serbian:

    Sorry:
    Izvini! (informal) (Cyrillic: Извини)
    Izvinite! (formal) (Извините)
    Оprosti! (Oпрости)
    Оprostite! (Опростите)

    I'm sorry: Žao mi je (Жао ми је).

    I apologize: Izvinjavam se (Извињавам се)

    It's OK:
    U redu je (У реду је)
    Nema veze (Нема везе)
    Ma ništa (Ма ништа).
     

    shaloo

    Senior Member
    English
    Panjabigator said:

    Shaloo, what is it in Tamil and Kannada?

    In Kannada, it is :
    Forgive me - Nanna Kshamasi
    Its alright- Parvaagillaa

    I'll find out about the Tamil translation and let you know soon.
     

    shaloo

    Senior Member
    English
    Muchas gracias Sara.
    It was a nice attempt to reply in french.
    A small correction, if u don't mind.

    En español se dice:......

    The actual sentence would be:

    En espagnol, on dit: ........

    Lo siento mucho(Hey! I just wanted to use it!!)
    Adios,
    Shalu
     

    vince

    Senior Member
    English
    je crois qu'elle parlait espagnol quand elle répondait...

    les deux langues sont très semblable, c'est probablement pourquoi tu as pensé que c'était du français!
     

    shaloo

    Senior Member
    English
    Oh! Est-ce que c'est vrai?!

    J'ai pensé que c'était français!

    Maintenant je dis : Lo siento mucho, Sara!

    Et, Merci beaucoup, Vince
     

    Lil_Star

    Senior Member
    Italian - Italy
    In italian we say:
    "Scusa/Scusami/Mi dispiace/sono spiacente!(we don't use it, though)"
    And you can answer with:
    "Non preoccuparti/Non fa niente"
     

    Abbassupreme

    Senior Member
    United States, English, Persian
    Afghan Persian (Farsi)

    Sorry: Bubukhshí (single person, informal)
    Bubukshín (mulitple people, formal, singular person, formal)
    Literal Translation: You forgive [me]

    It's okay: Hírus

    Bien

    In Iranian (colloquial) Persian:

    Sorry: Bebakhshid
    Baa 'arz e ma'zerat/marzerat (not sure which spelling is correct, but I'm leaning in favor of the first spelling given that ma'zerat (?) is probably an Arabic loanword.)
    Ma'zerat mikhaam.
    'Ozr(?) mikhaam (could be 'ozv . . . very hard for me to distinguish which)
    "Sharmandeh hastam" or simply "sharmandeh" (lit. I'm embarrassed)

    It's okay: "Eyb nadaare" or, in written Persian, "eyb nadaarad".
    "Eshkal nadaare"
     

    jonquiliser

    Senior Member
    Svediż tal-Finlandja
    Swedish:

    Sorry: "Förlåt (mig)!" or "Ursäkta mig!"
    It's OK: "Det är OK" or "Det gör inget"

    ;)

    Just to specify: "förlåt" and "jag är ledsen" would be to say you are sorry,
    "ursäkta (mig)" is sort of "excuse me" or sometimes, "I apologise"

    An informal answer to say "no worries" is also "det är lugnt".
     

    Chazzwozzer

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    I apologize: Özür dilerim
    I'm sorry: Üzgünüm
    Pardon: Pardon


    That's OK:
    Problem değil. / Sorun değil.
    All I remember in Turkish is "üzgünüm" (I'm not even sure you need the umlauts) and "kusuruma bakma" (which means "please do not see/look at my faults). But I think there are lots of other ways to say it.

    As always, I humbly await your corrections... :)
     

    Ilmo

    Member Emeritus
    Finnish:
    Anteeksi! (=pardon me)
    Anna anteeksi! / Antakaa anteeksi! (=forgive me/excuse me; the latter is polite form or when you are directing the apologies to several persons)
    Pyydän anteeksi (=I ask your pardon)
    Suo anteeksi /Suokaa anteeksi (=forgive me)
    Olen pahoillani (I'm sorry; this is a very mild apology)
     

    karuna

    Senior Member
    Latvian, Latvia
    Latvian:

    I'm sorry = Lūdzu, piedod! (familiar); Lūdzu, piedodiet! (formal)
    It's Ok = Nekas, nekas! (nothing, nothing) Nav par ko! (not for what, meaning: don't mention it.)
     

    Pando

    Member
    Finland: Swedish, Finnish, English
    Finnish:
    Anteeksi! (=pardon me)
    Anna anteeksi! / Antakaa anteeksi! (=forgive me/excuse me; the latter is polite form or when you are directing the apologies to several persons)
    Pyydän anteeksi (=I ask your pardon)
    Suo anteeksi /Suokaa anteeksi (=forgive me)
    Olen pahoillani (I'm sorry; this is a very mild apology)
    You forgot the answer.

    I think Ei se mitään (=it is nothing/it doesn't matter) would be the most common reply.
     

    Ilmo

    Member Emeritus
    You forgot the answer.

    I think Ei se mitään (=it is nothing/it doesn't matter) would be the most common reply.

    You are right, Pando.
    Pyydän anteeksi!
    Thanks for correcting.

    I agree with you. Or if it is something more complicated, you could answer "Älä välitä. Vahinko voi sattua kelle vain" (=Never mind. A mishap may happen to anybody).
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    In Polish:
    I'm sorry: przepraszam (most comon), przykro mi (not used often)
    It's ok: (nic) nie szkodzi, nic się nie stało, w porządku, spoko (informal)

    Tom
     

    kaverison

    Member
    Tamil
    Tamil
    Sorry - mannikkavum. (Also pardon me or forgive me). manniyungaL - you forgive me.


    (naan) mannippu keetkireen. I ask for pardon. Eet sounds like ate and een as in crane.

    It's ok - Paravaa illa. Paravaa From Hindi or sanskrit, illa < illai = no, not.
    Athanaala enna (so what, but polite remark).

    While I post this, I'm also thinking about the cultural background. The above words are modern words (with old roots). I wonder how or what they said in the olden days. I am sure they fealt apology, sorry. They were polire people. But, they might have expressed it in tone and context.

    Like when somebody is apologetic, they may say, "thappu paNNittenee" meaning, "I made a mistake".
    Similarly, to say "please" we use, "thayavu seythu", thayavu is clearly from sanskrit dhayaa. Again, more modern usage. Needcto research more....
     

    810senior

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    I hope Japanese apologies catch your attention. :) (bold ones are the literal translation)

    1.owabishimasuお詫びします。(formal) : I'll apologize to you; rarely used in conversation.
    2.moushiwake arimasen申し訳ありません。(formal) : I have no excuses for you
    3.sumimasenすみません。(formal but less polite than above) : My heart doesn't come clear, (because I feel so sorry for you).
    4.gomennasaiごめんなさい。 : Forgive me (gomen refers to forgiveness, apology)

    Colloquial:
    1.mengoめんご:verlan for gomen(sorry).
    2.gomenごめん:colloquial for gomennasai
    3.sumanaiすまない:colloquial for sumimasen
    4.suimasenすいません:colloquial for sumimasen
    5.sumanすまん:colloquial for sumimasen
    6.waruiわるい:I was bad, it's similar to it's my fault or my bad in English.
     

    ger4

    Senior Member
    German
    While I post this, I'm also thinking about the cultural background. The above words are modern words (with old roots). I wonder how or what they said in the olden days. I am sure they fealt apology, sorry [...] they might have expressed it in tone and context.
    These cultural differences are always interesting... People from English-speaking countries often seem to apologize in situations where in Germany an apology is (perhaps) implied but not necessarily expressed with words like 'sorry' or 'excuse me'. Often we say something like 'Oops - that wasn't my intention!' at least if the damage done isn't very serious. Sometimes this style of communication may come across as a bit rude... but apart from that:
    In Germany:

    Sorry: Verzeihung/Entschuldigung/Tut mir leid.
    It's ok: Macht nichts. (or "schon in Ordnung")
    Edit: More on the different ways to apologize in German here and here
     
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    Greek:

    «Ζητώ συγγνώμη» [ziˈto siŋˈɣnomi] --> to ask forbearance or simply «συγγνώμη» [siŋˈɣnomi] (fem.) --> I am sorry, pardon.
    Also «συγχώρεσέ με» [siŋˈxoɾeˌse me] («με» is enclitic) --> forgive me (when we entreat a single person), «συγχωρέσ(ε)τε με» [siŋxoˈɾes(e)te me] --> forgive me (more than one persons).
    The usual response is «δεν πειράζει» [ðem͜ biˈɾazi] --> (it's) no bother

    -MoGr fem. noun «συγγνώμη» [siŋˈɣnomi] < Classical fem. noun «συγγνώμη» sŭngnṓmē --> fellow-feeling, forbearance, lenient judgement, allowance < compound; prefix and preposition «σύν» sún (Attic «ξύν» k͡sún --> with, together (with obscure etymology) + Classical fem. noun «γνώμη» gnṓmē --> thought, judgement (PIE *ǵneh₃- to know cf Skt. जानाति (jānāti), to know, perceive; Lat. gnōscere; Proto-Germanic *knēaną; Proto-Slavic *znati).
    -MoGr v. «συγχωρώ» [siŋxoˈɾo] --> to forgive < Classical v. «συγχωρέω/συγχωρῶ» sŭnkʰōréō (uncontracted)/ sŭnkʰōrô (contracted) --> to come together, meet, concede, give up, forgive, allow < compound; prefix and preposition «σύν» sún (Attic «ξύν» k͡sún --> with, together (with obscure etymology) + Classical denominative v. «χωρέω/χωρῶ» kʰōréō (uncontracted)/ kʰōrô (contracted)--> to make room, give way, recede, step, go forth, make progress, comprehend, contain, catch, find a place < Classical fem. noun «χώρᾱ» kʰṓrā --> space, interspace, place, position, rank, location, region, estate, land, country (with uncertain etymology). Noun: «συγχώρεση» [siŋˈxoɾesi] (fem.) and «συγχώρηση» [siŋˈxoɾisi] (fem.) --> forgiveness < Classical 3rd declension fem. noun «συγχώρησις» sŭnkʰṓrēsis --> agreement, consent.
    -MoGr v. «ζητώ» [ziˈto] and «ζητάω» [ziˈta.o] --> to inquire, investigate, ask, request < Classical v. «ζητέω/ζητῶ» zētéō (uncontracted)/ zētô (contracted) --> to search, research, inquire, investigate (with unclear etymology).
    -MoGr v. «πειράζω» [piˈɾazo] --> to tempt, tease, bother, annoy < Classical denominative v. «πειράζω» peirázō --> to tempt, put to test, try < Classical fem. noun «πεῖρᾰ» peîră --> test, research, experience (PIE *per- to cross, pass cf Skt. पिपर्ति (piparti), to bring over to; Av. frā, to cross; Lat. portāre; Proto-Germanic *faraną, to go, travel).
     

    kaverison

    Member
    Tamil
    These cultural differences are always interesting... People from English-speaking countries often seem to apologize in situations where in Germany an apology is (perhaps) implied but not necessarily expressed with words like 'sorry' or 'excuse me'. Often we say something like 'Oops - that wasn't my intention!' at least if the damage done isn't very serious. Sometimes this style of communication may come across as a bit rude... but apart from that:
    Thanks for your comments. Very well said; yes, that's exactly what I mean. If only everyone understands each other at this level, there won't be any war -at least not the war of words :)

    To expand on what I said, athanaala enna (so what), is actually delivered in many different ways - in an authoratative (angry?) tone, it could be like "whaddaya mean?". In a polite tone, it is "that's ok". I didn't realize it (because our language is phonetic, each letter supposedly representing only one sound), we do have accent variations.

    @810senior, I read in a travel book in Tamil, that Japanese use asothaskaa (pronunciation not right), to imply different meanings for different contexts with tonal variations. Is that true?
     

    810senior

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    @kaverison, as far as I know there is no such a phrase in Japanese, even the one where its pronunciation is similar. If you mean sumimasen, it implies many meaning according to different contexts: excuse me, thank you, I'm sorry, pardon?

    So to speak it's a magical and omnipotent word.
     

    kaverison

    Member
    Tamil
    Sumimasen! There are overloaded words in Tamil like that too. For eg., vaNakkam means greetings, we use it to say hi and bye and every greeting in between (good morning etc)!

    I went back to trusty friend, Google to look for that word. I wonder if he meant ahso desu ka? Does it mean anything? I found one page talking about this. Sumimasen!
     

    810senior

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Great, vaNakkam to all! :)

    @kaverison Ahso itself doesn't mean anything but ah soudesuka is fine, which means "Ah, I see".
    You can also make other variation by omitting and adding the part after the sou like these: sou-dane, sou-kana, sou-ne, sou-desune, sou-kamone, sou-da etc.

    Out of curiosity can I know the grammatical structure of the vaNakkam? It sounds interesting. (Google let me know that word also means welcome doesn't it?)
     

    kaverison

    Member
    Tamil
    @810senior, வணக்கம் (vaNakkam)! You are right, it's like your sumimasen - an omnipotent word. It can mean, "welcome" as in welcome to our home or "hello", "nice to meet you", "Good Morning", "Good Bye", "worship", "respects", "salute" etc. Well it doesn't mean all those, but those meanings are implied. Every Tamil word is overloaded with multiple meanings and many words may mean the same thing as well.

    As for the grammar behind the word vaNakkam, @aruniyan an will be able to explain this better (he has a site about Tamil etymology). But, let me try.
    The root for this may be வளை (vaLai) - (v) meaning to bend, bow etc. > வண, வணை + கு > வணங்கு (v) + அம் > வணக்கம்.

    The ங்(ng) > the க் transformation (Germination?) happens per grammar rules to make the words flow smoothly - Tamil being agglutinative language, words are joined together with prefixes and suffixes to make expressions. (Sorry, I am ignorant on the Linguistics terms for this).

    கு suffix - finite verbs in 1st (pers. sing. fut.). அம் suffix makes it a verbal noun.

    (There are other words like this inakkam - coherenace, concordance, pinakkam - the opposite etc)

    In a sense வணக்கம் refers to what Japanese do when they meet each other - bowing. At some point, I think we got lazy and settled on doing namaste with two hands:)

    Note about the sounds and letters: Tamil has 2 l sounds - ல (la) as in color and ள (rla) like in girl. (actually, there is also ழ (zh) sort of like American R). Correspondingly, there are 3 N sounds too.
    • ந (na) is the usual n sound in English. It always come at the beginning of a word like நடு (nadu) center or plant (a tree) or நாடு (naadu) - country or seek.
    • ன (lna) as in kiln. மன்னன் (mannan) - King; This is like merging sounds ல + ந.
    • ண (rlNA) - may be like the N in gurney or journey, as in our word வணக்கம். This is like merging, ள + ந.
    Sorry for the interlude. Now lets get back to apologies - மன்னிக்கவும்!
     
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    810senior

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    @kaverison, வணக்கம் again! :) Thanks for enlightening me about the details!

    @AmaryllisBunny, maybe it's too difficult and laborious to compare them but I guess they're in same polite level; any of them can be used under the almost same circumstance.
     
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