Appear in court???

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  • profesora de ingles

    New Member
    English USA
    If you are a defendant, plaintiff, or witness, you "appear in court." That is probably your context for asking.

    If you are an observer only, you would say something like, "attend the court case" or "be present when the case is tried" or simply "go to court."

    "Appearing in court" implies that you have a role in the legal process.
     

    emma42

    Senior Member
    British English
    Here are some examples of usage:

    The defendant is summonsed to appear in court on the 15th February [formal language].

    I've to go to court on the 15th.

    Dear Mr X, as you know, you are to attend court on the 15th February...[again, formal language].

    Mr Y will appear for the defendant in the case of Regina -v- Mr X. [formal language].

    One would not usually say, "I have to appear in court..." in conversation.
     

    swyves

    Senior Member
    UK English, Living in Peru
    I would think of "go to court" as being involved in the case.
     

    emma42

    Senior Member
    British English
    I'm not sure what you mean by "involved in the case", swyves. Anyone who works in a court might say "I'm going to court", as well as defendants, witnesses, observers, journalists...
     

    Prower

    Banned
    Russian
    Would there be a difference between

    1) I need to know when he appears at court. (Does it mean that he works at court and goes there regularly?)
    2) I need to know when he is appearing at court.(Does it mean that he doesn't usually go to court and his visit is a temporal situation?)
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    First of all, I (US) would say "in court," not "at court."

    #1 is possible; I don't know when I would use #2. It would be more common to ask "when is he usually in court?"
     

    Hau Ruck

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I don't really know how to explain this, but, to me, #1 would be used for someone who either works in the court or is there as a defendant/plaintiff.
    #2 would only work for me if the person in question was a defendant/plaintiff.

    And, as pob14 said, one does not appear "at" court. You'd appear "in" court. :)
     

    Prower

    Banned
    Russian
    First of all, I (US) would say "in court," not "at court."

    #1 is possible; I don't know when I would use #2. It would be more common to ask "when is he usually in court?"
    That's the point, he is not usually in court. It was just an unforeseen situation which made him go there.


    #2 would only work for me if the person in question was a defendant/plaintiff.
    So as I presume the second one is for those occasions when someone is appearing IN (!!!) court not on a regular basis. Right?
     

    Hau Ruck

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    That's the point, he is not usually in court. It was just an unforeseen situation which made him go there.

    So as I presume the second one is for those occasions when someone is appearing IN (!!!) court not on a regular basis. Right?
    Well, that's a bit of a "loaded question" for me.
    I think what you mean is, someone who's not there daily; perhaps an employee of the court. This would be true.
    However, say it's a criminal who has frequent citations/charges/appearances. You could most certainly apply it to such a person. :)
     
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