appears in the middle of the fifteenth century

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Himanshu Sindhi, Sep 12, 2018.

  1. Himanshu Sindhi Senior Member

    Hindi
    This question was asked in an exam in India as...

    In the following questions, some parts of the sentences have errors and some are correct. Find out which part of a sentence has an error. The number of that part is the answer. If a sentence is free from error, your answer is (4) i.e. No error.

    The earliest credible evidence of coffee-drinking or knowledge of the coffee tree appears in the middle of the fifteenth century as evident from the accounts of Ahmed al-Ghaffar in Yemen.

    As per the official answer key, the error is in "part 2" (I've separated the parts by breaking underline) but I don't know what it is.

    This is the complete sentence i found on some site - "The earliest credible evidence of coffee-drinking or knowledge of the coffee tree appears in the middle of the 15th century in the accounts of Ahmed al-Ghaffar in Yemen."

    Here is the link - About Coffee - Coffee Beans Online - Best Beans

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Franco-filly Senior Member

    Southern England
    English - Southern England
    I think it must be "appeared"
     
  3. lingobingo

    lingobingo Senior Member

    London
    English - England
    The blue sentence is excellent English.

    The test sentence is rubbish. You can’t say that “evidence … is evident”! And I don’t think there’s a viable way of changing the red section to put things right, since clearly it’s the third section that’s wrong.
     
  4. Hermione Golightly

    Hermione Golightly Senior Member

    London
    British English
    I'd say using the simple present is fine and agree that the added words in the third part are the deliberate error.
     
  5. kentix

    kentix Senior Member

    English - U.S.
    It's possible they think fifteenth should be capitalized. (Or even not spelled out!)
     
  6. lingobingo

    lingobingo Senior Member

    London
    English - England
    Except that neither of those is likely? :)
     
  7. Hermione Golightly

    Hermione Golightly Senior Member

    London
    British English
    Only one error is required. The examiners added to the original and their addition is surely the major error.
     
  8. Loob

    Loob Senior Member

    English UK
    Well ...

    I think
    (1) that it would have been helpful to break the sentence into parts (1) (2) (3) as in the original question
    (2) I would say that, in the sentence as written in the test, the error lies in the last part: it should read "as is evident", not "as evident".
     
  9. lingobingo

    lingobingo Senior Member

    London
    English - England
    Oooh. I think not. The correct text is shown in blue in the OP. And, as I said in #3, the subject of the comment is itself “evidence”, so following that with “evident” would be very poor style.
     
  10. Loob

    Loob Senior Member

    English UK
    Ah - good point.
    So however you analyse it, the error lies in "as evident from".

    So presumably not "part 2"?
     
  11. lingobingo

    lingobingo Senior Member

    London
    English - England
    Quite. Yet another appalling bad test question.
     

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