Apple('s) stock price

Kacy.H

Senior Member
Chinese
I remember Uncle Jack told me there was no 's after a company's name, so I was wonder if this rule applies to this context.

1. Apple stock price decreased sharply in the past few years.
2. Apple's stock price decreased sharply in the past few years.

Which one is right?

Many many thanks
 
  • Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    I remember Uncle Jack told me there was no 's after a company's name
    In what context did I say that? You always need to give context in English.

    In everyday English, your sentence (2) is correct, but where is this sentence written? As a headline, sentence (1) might be fine (although it is not written as if it is a headline), but "price" in this context is countable, so in an ordinary sentence, "Apple stock price" needs the definite article.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I remember Uncle Jack told me there was no 's after a company's name, so I was wonder if this rule applies to this context.
    I doubt it.
    1. Starbucks does not use an apostrophe, as does McDonald's or Wendy's
    2. The possessive is not necessary in Starbucks employees any more than in "Burger King employees" or "Chevrolet employees."

    If, for some reason, you need the possessive, it would be "Starbucks' responses to the charges was ...." (At least in American newspapers)

    We can use the possessive in terms of stock prices, e.g. Apple's stock price, General Motors' stock price, etc.
     

    Kacy.H

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    It depends upon context whether a possessive is used. Don't get hung up on the apostrophe.
    I just saw 'Apple stock'!
    So, it is 'Apple's stock price', but 'Apple stock'? Amazing!

    Apple stock was valued at just below 5,000 in 2011.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    So, it is 'Apple's stock price', but 'Apple stock'? Amazing!
    Why is it amazing? They are different things, and they may well have been used in a different context.

    I hesitate to offer any general rule, as English is so heavily dependent on context, but with a concrete noun such as "employee" or "stock", business names are generally used attributively, so "Starbucks employees" and "Apple stock". They don't have to be, and there is nothing wrong with "Starbucks' employees" or "Apple's stock", but this is less common. However, with abstract nouns such as "stock price", it is more common to use the possessive: "Apple's stock price".
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top