Apples as dessert

Roymalika

Senior Member
Punjabi
Yesterday, some guest came to my home. I served Biryani and Chicken Quorma to them. And I served apples as dessert.

Can apples be used as dessert?
 
  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    It would be more usual to serve them in something.

    Your "I served apples as dessert" tends to imply that the apples had been prepared in some way, e.g. cored and sliced. If you simply handed them each an apple, you would say
    "Yesterday, some guest came to my home. I served Biryani and Chicken Quorma to them. And after that I gave them an apple each/some apples."

    To qualify as "a dessert", it is usual for the food to have been processed in some way.
     

    Roymalika

    Senior Member
    Punjabi
    If you simply handed them each an apple, you would say
    "Yesterday, some guest came to my home. I served Biryani and Chicken Quorma to them. And after that I gave them an apple each/some apples."
    In that case it would not be called a 'dessert'?
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    My opinion is that an apple (or other single, unprocessed piece of food) would not qualify as "a dessert" - to me, the word "dessert" is too grand for what is a simple fruit.

    I note that Tunaafi (and, I think, Keith) does not take this view, and is happy to call an apple a dessert.

    So, in answer to your question
    In that case it would not be called a 'dessert'?
    You can decide for yourself if you wish to say
    "And after that I gave them an apple each/some apples."
    or
    "And I served apples as dessert."
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Not for me. The only thing 'prepared' about the fruit served as dessert in our house is that it's washed and placed in a fruit bowl or basket.
    Me too. It certainly qualifies for the usual meaning of "dessert", although a quick look at a dictionary suggests that this might not be true in AE.
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    My opinion is that an apple (or other single, unprocessed piece of food) would not qualify as "a dessert" - to me, the word "dessert" is too grand for what is a simple fruit.
    I do believe I'm inclined to agree with you, Mr Q. I might call that afters:

    We had biryani and chicken korma with apples for afters.
    We had
    pommes à la mode de Quelquechose for dessert.
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    English (northeastern US)
    You can decide for yourself if you wish to say
    "And after that I gave them an apple each/some apples."
    or
    "And I served apples as dessert."
    "And after that I gave them an apple each/some apples." This sounds as though I gave them apples as a souvenir to take home.

    "And I served apples as dessert." This sounds as though I put a bowl of apples on the table for everyone to eat. In reality I would probably have cored them and cut them into slices for easier eating.

    To me, 'dessert' has two meanings pertaining to food:
    1) the course that follows the rest of the meal, and
    2) the food that you serve for this course.
    The food that's served is usually something that involves several ingredients, mixing, measuring, cooking, etc. But that doesn't mean apple slices are too simple to be called dessert (meaning #1). However, the particular sentence "and I served apples as dessert." could mean "I served them apples after the rest of the meal." (meaning #2).

    In answer to #10, 'apples as dessert' means, to me, just apples. If other ingredients are involved, then I'd use the word or phrase for the specific dishes that I make for an apple-based dessert: apple pie, apple tart, apple pan dowdy (also spelled as one word - pandowdy).
     

    tunaafi

    Senior Member
    English - British (Southern England)
    I do believe I'm inclined to agree with you, Mr Q. I might call that afters:

    We had biryani and chicken korma with apples for afters.
    We had
    pommes à la mode de Quelquechose for dessert.
    For many native speakers, pudding, sweet, dessert and afters are the same thing. The choice depends on region, background, education etc, not on what these things consist of.
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    Agreed, Tunaafi. For me, dessert is the posh name for pudding, which is the everyday name for "the sweet dish which comes after a savoury meal". So "I served apples as dessert" is perfectly normal. These would be whole, uncooked apples - my everyday dessert pudding, as it happens.

    The alternative would be "I served apple as dessert", which would probably mean that you cooked it and made a purée. Also good.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I would say you could serve apples for dessert but you wouldn't call an individual apple "a dessert", like you would a piece of pie.

    If I sliced the apples like Roxxxannne, then I would have no hesitation saying, "I served apple slices for dessert." There was preparation involved.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    For me, dessert is the posh name for pudding, which is the everyday name for "the sweet dish which comes after a savoury meal"
    For me "pudding" is a posh word for "afters."(I never got on with "pudding" - pudding is something like sponge/Christmas pudding - anything else should be described properly so you know what you're getting. :D)
    "I served apple as dessert", which would probably mean that you cooked it and made a purée. Also good.
    :thumbsup: (With a nod to the uncountable form.)
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Just a little point. I don't know about what's done in the USA, but in Britain apple varieties are classified as "dessert apples" and "cooking apples". If I eat a whole apple for dessert I'd be eating a dessert variety, if I eat apple pie for dessert I'd be eating a cooking variety. :)
     
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