Applicable

iFeXx

New Member
Germany/Alemania,German/Alemán
Hi there!

I want to say, that some circumstances regarding a special issue are applicable to many different issues.

"These circumstances are not ____ (only? mere?) applicable to (this issue); further, it is to say that they even got validation to (another issue)."

1. How do I fill the gap between "...not ___ applicable to..."
2. Is it right to say that "circumstances are applicable to something"? (Do I have to use "valid"?)

Thank you!
 
  • maxiogee

    Banned
    imithe
    I would suggest…
    "These circumstances are not solely applicable to (this issue), they have been found to apply to (another issue)."

    I think that the "not solely applicable" means that you can shorten the introduction of the other issue.
     

    iFeXx

    New Member
    Germany/Alemania,German/Alemán
    For instance:

    "These circumstances are not solely applicable to the issue of immigration to Britain, they have been found to apply to emigration."

    Is this correct?
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    imithe
    iFeXx said:
    For instance:

    "These circumstances are not solely applicable to the issue of immigration to Britain, they have been found to apply to emigration."

    Is this correct?
    As long as the emigration is 'from Britain'.
    I don't want to pry, or ask you to reveal something you'd prefer not to - but, are you sure that "circumstances" is the correct word for what you are dealing with? It doesn't sound right with "issue of emigration".
     

    iFeXx

    New Member
    Germany/Alemania,German/Alemán
    Well, I'm writing a text about post-colonialism.

    "[...] This does mainly result from the daily increasing discrepancies about immigration with respect to the inhabitants and the British government. These circumstances are not solely applicable to the issue of immigration of Indian people to Britain, they have been found to apply to the immigration of Bangladeshis. [...]"

    This text is just a practice for me to write about immigration. I'm not entirely sure, whether "circumstances" is a suitable word for what I meant.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    iFeXx,
    I'm not sure I understand what you are getting at. Some comments follow. I hope you don't mind if I play with your sentences a little.

    [...] This does mainly result from
    This results from ...
    This mainly results from ...
    This results mainly from ...
    This is a result of ...
    This is caused by ...
    This is a consequence of ...

    the daily increasing
    the daily-increasing

    discrepancies about immigration with respect to the inhabitants and the British government.
    disagreement on immigration between the British public and their Government.
    Several guesses there.

    These circumstances are not solely applicable to the issue of immigration of Indian people to Britain, they have been found to apply to the immigration of Bangladeshis.
    I still don't know what the circumstances refers to:)
    This has been found to apply not only to Indian immigrants, but also to Bangladeshis.

    Now I have two sentences beginning with This.
    That won't do. There's nothing wrong with it, but I couldn't sign my name to it:) Let's try gluing them together ...
    This is a consequence of the daily-increasing disagreement on immigration between the British public and their Government and has been found to apply not only to Indian immigrants, but also to Bangladeshis.

    Now I've got a sentence that I quite like.
    It's a pity it doesn't say what you probably wanted to say:D
     

    Radiance

    Member
    China, speaks Chinese, English, French
    panjandrum's final sentence is also grammatically better than the original because it does not contain a comma splice.

    "These circumstances are not solely applicable to the issue of immigration to Britain" is a full sentence. "they have been found to apply to emigration" is also a full sentence. They cannot be joined with a comma. If you do not want to use conjunctions, you'll have to use the semicolon.

    My version of the sentence:
    "These circumstances are not solely applicable to the issue of immigration to Britain; they have also been found to apply to emigration."

    or

    "These circumstances are not solely applicable to the issue immigration to Britain, but have also been found to apply to emmigration."
     
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