apply for the master's degree in <the field of> <the area of> X

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nh01

Senior Member
Turkish
Apply for the masters's degree in X, in the field of X/ in the area of X <——-Topic added to post by moderator (Florentia52)——->

Are they all acceptable? Thanks.
 
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  • nh01

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Thanks.

    I haven't decided yet but I plan to apply for the master's degree in literature/ in the field of literature/ in the area of literature.
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    ... I haven't decided yet but I plan to apply for the master's degree in literature/ in the field of literature/ in the area of literature.
    Your first version is best because it is shortest and most direct: "master's degree in literature."

    Separately, it should be a master's degree, not the master's degree. Yours will not be the only such master's degree.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Would they be wrong even if they are not short and direct? Thanks.
    It seems that you are not applying for a Master's in Literature, but you are applying for some more specific degree (one in that general area) that you haven't decided on like a Master's in French Novels Beginning with M or a Master's in the Use of Color in British Poetry.
     
    I find the sentence odd. One may apply for acceptance in a Master's degree program at a university, and after being accepted one may earn a master's degree, or be granted a master's degree. However, one does not apply for the degree itself.
     
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    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    American English (New England and NYC)
    I would say 'apply for admission to the M.A. program in [title of program].'
     
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