Appoint a company as a corporate patron

Gustavoang

Senior Member
Venezuela / Castilian
Hello.

Does it sound good to say "The YYY non-profit appointed XXX company as their corporate patron"?

Doesn't to name sound better than to appoint in this context?

Thanks in advance.
 
  • Gustavoang

    Senior Member
    Venezuela / Castilian
    Hello, tepatria and bibliolept... Also, thanks for your quick answers!

    Yes, the idea is to name officially a company as a corporate patron of a non-profit... would "appoint" be more formal than "name"?

    TIA.
     

    BoTrojan

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Hi,

    If I understand what you're trying to say, none of your options makes complete sense, at least to me. Corporate patronage typically refers companies or corporations that make a decision to support financially a non-revenue associated cause or organization. For that reason, corporate patrons aren't typically appointed or named, per se, because it is the patron corporation itself that is making the decision to offer support.

    So here's my suggestion:

    "The XXX non-profit foundation welcomed (or announced) YYY, Inc., as a corporate patron"

    There are some subtle but important things in here:

    1. Corporate patrons are announced or welcomed, not appointed or even named (unless somehow the patronage is competitive and selective, which would be highly unusual, as most non-profits need all of the corporate patronage they can get).
    2. Their is a plural possessive pronoun and so can't be used to refer back to a singular antecedent noun (XXX non-profit in this case). You wouldn't even want to use the gramatically correct alternative its, because this would suggest that XXX non-profit only has one corporate patron ... YYY, Inc.

    Follow me?
     

    bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    BoTrojan, due to the different uses of "named," I would argue that you can use it in this situation. Nonetheless, perhaps my other suggestions, "chose," "selected," and "announced" are more idiomatic.
     

    Gustavoang

    Senior Member
    Venezuela / Castilian
    Hi!

    I think "welcome" is the perfect word! I'll say "The XXX non-profit foundation welcomed (or announced) YYY, Inc., as a corporate patron".

    Thank you all for your suggestions!
     

    BoTrojan

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Named isn't wrong here and you might see it used in this context from time to time. It's only a matter of what is MOST appropriate. So, if I'm being asked, I'd recommend announced or welcomed over named. Conversely, I'd very strongly advise against chosen or selected for the logical reasons I stated. MOST patronage deals aren't selective on the part of the target of the support, making those words illogical.
     
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