appointments page, situations vacant page

Discussion in 'English Only' started by DBlomgren, Oct 12, 2009.

  1. DBlomgren

    DBlomgren Senior Member

    Costa Rica
    English, USA
    Hello,

    I need some help from Brits on this one. In Business Vocabulary in Use Intermediate, which is supposed to cover both American and British English, I found these sentences:

    Fred is a van driver but he was fed up with long trips. He looked in the situations vacant pages of his local newspaper...

    Harry is a building engineer. He saw a job in the appointments pages of one of the national newspapers.

    I think "situations vacant" corresponds to the "want ads" or "classified ads" in American newspapers, but I'm not familiar with "appointment pages". My best guess is that it's referring to display ads for jobs. Is that correct?

    If so, I don't know if there's a word or expression to describe such ads other than "display ads." Any help? (And if an editor of Business Vocabulary in Use happens to read this, please add the American equivalents in your next edition!)
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2009
  2. Copyright

    Copyright Senior Member

    Penang
    American English
    The opinion of an American:
    Situations vacant pages is for blue-collar jobs.
    Appointments pages is for white-collar jobs.

    Both are want ads or classified ads in American English. They would not, in my opinion, be display ads, which are more like publicly displayed posters advertising products or services.
     
  3. pickarooney

    pickarooney Senior Member

    Provence, France
    English (Ireland)
    They both mean the very same thing to me and have no connotations of skilled or unskilled labour. Then again, I've never paid close attention as to which newspapers use which term and what kind of jobs are featured in each, so I may be overlooking an obvious difference.

    In any case, both are subsections of the classified ads section, which also features items for sale and services offered.
     
  4. DBlomgren

    DBlomgren Senior Member

    Costa Rica
    English, USA
    That makes sense. I'd like to hear from others too. Do the ads appear in a different format or are they just in different sections?
     
  5. bluegiraffe

    bluegiraffe Senior Member

    Nottingham, England
    English - England
    There is no distinction between blue collar and white collar jobs, they are just 2 different terms for the same thing.
     
  6. Copyright

    Copyright Senior Member

    Penang
    American English
    To DBlomgren... bluegiraffe and pickarooney are in Great Britain, so I would listen to them rather than American me. I based my conjecture on the fact that in British English-speaking Hong Kong, appointments are always white-collar... van drivers need not apply.

    But it sounds like appointments pages and situations vacant pages in Britain are simply generic terms for what are want ads or classified ads in the U.S. Live and learn.
     
  7. pickarooney

    pickarooney Senior Member

    Provence, France
    English (Ireland)
    France, actually, but how and ever.
     
  8. Copyright

    Copyright Senior Member

    Penang
    American English
    Even as I was typing, I thought I should check physical location rather than language... sorry, Mr. Pick. I hope you're enjoying yourself. :)
     
  9. DBlomgren

    DBlomgren Senior Member

    Costa Rica
    English, USA
    Bluegiraffe, in the States blue collar and white collar have different meanings. Blue collar refers to unskilled and semiskilled work (cooks, mechanics) and white collar refers to skilled work, generally requiring more training or experience.

    I'm still mystified as to the difference between appointments pages and situations vacant pages. I can't believe the book would imply that they are different if there were no difference.
     
  10. bluegiraffe

    bluegiraffe Senior Member

    Nottingham, England
    English - England
    Blue collar and white collar have a different meaning to what in the States? They have the same meanings listed above in the UK too, but we do not seperate them in the lists of jobs for the unskilled and the skilled/office workers! They are all the job ads/situations vacant/whatever you want to call it.

    I don't think the book is specifying a difference, I think it's just giving two examples of the different terms we use. If you open a British newpaper to the job ads, you will see they are generally in categories such as "teaching" "administration" "automotive industry" etc, but within that, you have a mixture of white and blue collar jobs.
     
  11. Ann O'Rack Senior Member

    UK
    UK English
    Personally, I'd look on a website nowadays, or "the jobs pages" in a newspaper.

    I don't see the two phrases as anything more sinister than simple synonyms. It may be whoever wrote the article just wanted to a little variety and used both "situations vacant pages" and "appointments pages". It's possible that they might have been different to some, but just consider how many jobs get inflated. It used to be that a PA (or personal assistant) was a very specialised role but nowadays anyone who can type and fill in a calendar gets called a PA.
     
  12. DBlomgren

    DBlomgren Senior Member

    Costa Rica
    English, USA
    Bluegiraffe, thanks for the comment. Now I understand that you meant there is no difference in the ads for blue and white collar jobs. With all the input, I'm willing to accept that the appointments page and situations wanted can be synonymous. Thank you all for your information!
     
  13. bluegiraffe

    bluegiraffe Senior Member

    Nottingham, England
    English - England
    Sorry, I've just re-read my post and it was about as clear as mud! I wondered why you didn't understand, but yes, that's what I meant - there's no difference in the ads!
     
  14. Wishfull Senior Member

    jp
    Hi.
    I can understand why "situation" is plural in "situations vacant page", because there are a lot of jobs offered.

    My question is;
    If I want to advertise a job for one person, how should I write?
    Suppose I'm a employer, and wanting one more employee for my company's job.

    1. "Situation vacant"
    2. "The situation vacant"
    3. "Situations vacant"

    I think 1 and 2 are correct, and 3 is wrong.
     
  15. DBlomgren

    DBlomgren Senior Member

    Costa Rica
    English, USA
    Wishfull, I don't think you will need to use any of these terms. They are titles of sections in a newspaper and not found in the ads themselves.

    As for the correctness of the grammar, I think 1 (for one position) and 3 (for more than one position) are correct. I think 2 is incorrect because when you say "the situation vacant" you're talking about a specific situation as if I know about it, but I don't.
     
  16. Wishfull Senior Member

    jp
    Thank you DBlomgren.:)
    I got it.
    Have a nice weekend.
     

Share This Page

Loading...