appositive phrase after a list

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AntiScam

Senior Member
Arabic
Hello,

His interest was so keen, in fact, that he was named after it. The young boy who had been Dong Moy Shu became Dong Kingman. The name Kingman was selected for its two parts, “king” and “man”; Cantonese for “scenery” and “composition.”
Source: Dong Kingman: Painter of Cities (from a PSAT/NMSQT and PSAT 10 test)

The correct choice for the underlined text is B.

A: NO CHANGE
B: parts: “king” and “man,”

C: parts “king” and “man”;
D: parts; “king” and “man”

'Cantonese for “scenery” and “composition.”' is a noun phrase because Cantonese here is used as a noun, and not an adjectival phrase (Cantonese as an adjective). Is, therefore, the phrase is an appositive?
 
  • se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Personally, I would use commas here, and neither a colon nor a semicolon. I don't know what style guide your source follows.

    I used to have two goldfish, Batman and Robin, names from a TV show.
    I don't think the series of appositions is very elegant, because the two appositions have strongly contrasting underlying logics.
    - My goldfish were (called) Batman and Robin.
    - Batman and Robin were names (of characters) from a TV show.

    The two parts of the name were "king" and "man".
    "King" and "man" are Cantonese for "scenery" and "composition" respectively.
     
    Last edited:

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    His interest was so keen, in fact, that he was named after it. The young boy who had been Dong Moy Shu became Dong Kingman. The name Kingman was selected for its two parts, “king” and “man”; Cantonese for “scenery” and “composition.”

    The correct choice for the underlined text is B.

    B: parts: “king” and “man,”

    'Cantonese for “scenery” and “composition.”' is a noun phrase because Cantonese here is used as a noun, and not an adjectival phrase (Cantonese as an adjective). Is, therefore, the phrase is an appositive?
    B is the only possible correct answer from those four options. In the underlined part of the text that forms question 14, the semicolon is placed outside the inverted commas, instead of inside as per the American punctuation style used in the rest of the article.

    Yes, I agree that Cantonese for “scenery” and “composition.” is in apposition to “king” and “man,”.
     
    OP Sentence: His interest was so keen, in fact, that he was named after it. The young boy who had been Dong Moy Shu became Dong Kingman. The name Kingman was selected for its two parts, “king” and “man”; Cantonese for “scenery” and “composition.”

    Lingo, I have a problem in that "Cantonese" applies to the *words*.

    I understand apposition to work like this. I have a dog, a terrier, living in my home.


    Compare to My dog, Frou-frou (silly French words with no meaning), lives with me.
     
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    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I see it rather like that too.

    But if apposition means that two words or phrases are grammatically parallel and have the same referent, i.e. mean the same thing — if king is Cantonese for scenery and man is Cantonese for composition, does that not apply?
     
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