Appositive

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EnglishABC

Senior Member
NZ English
He will fit nicely into coach Andrew's plans.

I don't think the above is OK, specifically the emboldened words, because coach needs to be in apposition to 'Andrew' not the 'Andrew's plans.'

Do you think it's grammatical?
If not, how would you write it, or would you write it like this, even though it is not strictly correct?

Thanks
 
  • Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Hi ABC

    The sentence you quote seems fine to me.

    We can add the genitive 's to phrases:
    ~ the daughter of the King of Spain
    ~ the King of Spain's daughter.

    We're doing the same thing here:
    ~ the plans of coach Andrew
    ~ coach Andrew's plans.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I agree with Loob.

    He will fit nicely into coach Andrew's plans.
    And even if he is a big football player,
    He will fit nicely into coach Andrew's car.

    Can one really use embolden to describe the change in a typeface?
     

    EnglishABC

    Senior Member
    NZ English
    Can one really use embolden to describe the change in a typeface?

    I believe it technically can't.

    embolden: to make bold (encourage).

    I came across it used thus on a forum one day, and I thought it was quite clever how it was a play on the word 'bold' :)
     

    EnglishABC

    Senior Member
    NZ English
    We can add the genitive 's to phrases:
    ~ the daughter of the King of Spain
    ~ the King of Spain's daughter.

    We're doing the same thing here:
    ~ the plans of coach Andrew
    ~ coach Andrew's plans.
    I agree that it is seen and perhaps correct, but I don't understand how.

    An appositive has to equal the noun to which it is in apposition.

    coach does not equal Andrew's plans...
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Excuse me if I'm pointing out something you already know, but I would assume that someone named Andrew is the coach of a team of some sort thus people call him Coach Andrew (notice the capital C).
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I don't think it's an appositive. If it were, then indeed both should carry an apostrophe. There seem to me two ways of saying this:

    1. With an appositive -

    He will fit nicely into the coach's, Andrew's, plans.

    2. Without an appositive, what we've got -

    He will fit nicely into coach Andrew's plans.

    I don't feel that a capital letter is necessary in the second case, though it is in some other examples of this non-appositive use, e.g. He borrowed King Seth's crown.
     
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