apprehensive about

catherine1999

Senior Member
chinese
context:"I'm always a bit apprehensive about visiting Peter. "
Is it absolutely the same as "I'm always a bit apprehensive to visit Peter"
 
  • Joobs

    Banned
    Glasgow, Scotland - English
    context:"I'm always a bit apprehensive about visiting Peter. "
    Is it absolutely the same as "I'm always a bit apprehensive to visit Peter"
    No

    "I'm always a bit apprehensive to visit Peter" is wrong

    A way it would work is:

    "I'm always a bit apprehensive when visiting Peter... (why?)"

    In either case the sentence is flawed as it stands because you really need to give a reason for your apprehension. So you need to extend it. For instance:

    "I'm always a bit apprehensive about visiting Peter due to (because of) his violent outbursts."
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    But can't sentence follow other ones so the context may justify its use?
    The Smith's are such nervous people, especially their son. I'm always apprehensive about visiting Peter.

    The extension of the sentence in question is not obligatory, IMHO.


    Tom
     

    Joobs

    Banned
    Glasgow, Scotland - English
    But can't sentence follow other ones so the context may justify its use?
    The Smith's are such nervous people, especially their son. I'm always apprehensive about visiting Peter.

    The extension of the sentence in question is not obligatory, IMHO.

    Tom
    Yes one can follow on but in this example it doesn't work.

    Where is the link? Is Peter the son of the previous sentence or is he Mr Smith, or even someone else? Even if Peter is the son you still have no link. As it stands your second sentence is a statement without reason or link.

    How about this:

    The Smith's are such nervous people, especially their son, Peter. I'm always apprehensive about visiting Peter (him) because of this.

    or,

    The Smith's are such nervous people, especially their son, Peter. His nervousness always makes me apprehensive about paying (him) a visit.

    or,

    The Smith's are such nervous people, especially their son, Peter. For this reason, I'm always apprehensive about visiting Peter (him).
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    Well, the persons who are talking know the family and know who Peter is, so it's not important for them.
    Supposing someone else's listening, who doesn't know the Smiths, they could simply ask who Peter is if that's not clear enough from the overall context of the conversation.
    In my sample sentence, I mean Peter the son. Doesn't it stem from the flow of the sentence:
    The Smiths are such nervous people (first piece of information), especially their son, Peter. (second piece of information) I'm always apprehensive about visiting Peter. (third piece of information)? So I come from the most general information further to the most detailed one; each is logically connected with each other. Were Peter Mr Smith, I'd add an additional piece of information saying who he is.


    Tom
     

    Joobs

    Banned
    Glasgow, Scotland - English
    Well, the persons who are talking know the family and know who Peter is, so it's not important for them.
    Supposing someone else's listening, who doesn't know the Smiths, they could simply ask who Peter is if that's not clear enough from the overall context of the conversation.
    In my sample sentence, I mean Peter the son. Doesn't it stem from the flow of the sentence:
    The Smiths are such nervous people (first piece of information), especially their son, Peter. (second piece of information) I'm always apprehensive about visiting Peter. (third piece of information)? So I come from the most general information further to the most detailed one; each is logically connected with each other. Were Peter Mr Smith, I'd add an additional piece of information saying who he is.

    Tom
    "The Smiths are such nervous people..." (first piece of information),

    Fine, this was never in doubt or question.

    "...especially their son, Peter." (second piece of information)

    No, your original never had information on who Peter was. Anyway, its there now, so fine.

    "I'm always apprehensive about visiting Peter." (third piece of information)?

    No this is not information it is a statement.

    Yes, we know Peter is nervous but it is not implicit that this is why you are apprehensive? Peter could also be a convicted axe murderer prone to bouts of sudden and extreme violence and perhaps that is why you are apprehensive? Can you see what I am getting at.
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    "The Smiths are such nervous people..." (first piece of information),

    Fine, this was never in doubt or question.

    "...especially their son, Peter." (second piece of information)

    No, your original never had information on who Peter was. Anyway, its there now, so fine.
    There's shouldn't be Peter in the second piece of information, I had a look at your suggestions and forgot about mine while writing my answer. Sorry about that.

    "I'm always apprehensive about visiting Peter." (third piece of information)?

    No this is not information it is a statement.
    Why is it not information please? I reveal to my interlocutour that I'm apprehensive when Peter visits me. This is something new to them.

    Yes, we know Peter is nervous but it is not implicit that this is why you are apprehensive? Peter could also be a convicted axe murderer prone to bouts of sudden and extreme violence and perhaps that is why you are apprehensive? Can you see what I am getting at.
    Hm... I think I can, but you are adding some new bit to it.
    In my examples there's nothing about that, I'm apprehensive when he visits me, because, as metioned in the previous sentence, he's very nervous, there's nothing about why he is so and if this causes me apprehensive. There can be many reasons for his being nervous starting with the fact that this is simply his trait of character, and this is what I'd mechanically understand while reading any formulation of this sort without further context, and finishing with things like various mental disorders. There's nothing in the discussion that says he's an axe killer, I believe that were that piece necessary it would be mentioned. Saying that someone is nervous is a simple statement of fact which is the cause of my apprehension when Peter's visiting me or have I missed something here?



    Tom
     

    Joobs

    Banned
    Glasgow, Scotland - English
    Why is it not information please? I reveal to my interlocutour that I'm apprehensive when Peter visits me. This is something new to them.
    OK, but it not information pertinent to what you are trying to say. That is, it is not the piece of information one needs to close the circle of narrative you are presenting. It introduces something without establishing its true link.

    Please don't misunderstand I can well imagine and assume that the reason for the apprehension is his nervousness but that is merely a guess I am making. If you do not clarify this somehow the reader will always be left wondering if their guess was correct. The problem I have is:

    I wonder why the character would be so apprehensive about visiting someone just because they had a nervous disposition - it seems a bit weak as a cause of apprehension therefore I begin to think and conjecture on whether there may be some other reason. I may also wonder whether I have missed something else you had previously written thereby deflecting from my reading and hopefully enjoyment of your story.

    I do think it would read better if you did include such a linkage. Anyway I have given you my opinion and reasons so maybe it would be best to ask or wait for others to comment and see if they agree or disagree with me/you on the matter. Obviously it is ultimately for you to decide what you wish to do - so good luck with the writing whatever you choose to do.
     

    liliput

    Senior Member
    U.K. English
    context:"I'm always a bit apprehensive about visiting Peter. ":tick:
    Is it absolutely the same as "I'm always a bit apprehensive to visit Peter":cross:
    No, you cannot say you are apprehensive to visit someone. You could say,
    "I'm anxious to visit Peter" but that would mean you were keen to visit him, i.e. almost the opposite to "I'm anxious/apprehensive about visiting Peter" (which means you are worried about it).
     
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