Apprenticeship to

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kenny4528

Senior Member
Mandarin, Taiwan
Hi,

He will instead visit the Special Forces in a non-operational context as part of his wider training which is being seen as an apprenticeship to becoming king.
I wonder whether I can use become instead of becoming in this paragraph? If not, what is the reasoning? Thank you.
 
  • Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Hi Kenny. How nice to see your shining face again!:)

    No, "becoming" is the correct word here. It's just the logic of the statement. An apprenticeship is served over time while the apprentice is learning to become something.

    He is learning to become the king. He is mastering the skills required. He will become the king. He is "becoming" the king.
     

    kenny4528

    Senior Member
    Mandarin, Taiwan
    Hi Kenny. How nice to see your shining face again!:)

    No, "becoming" is the correct word here. It's just the logic of the statement. An apprenticeship is served over time while the apprentice is learning to become something.

    He is learning to become the king. He is mastering the skills required. He will become the king. He is "becoming" the king.
    Sorry for getting back so late and thank you for your detailed explanation, Dimcl.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Dimcl is right that becoming is correct, but I don't agree with the explanation. The reason it's becoming is that becoming king is a gerund phrase that functions as the object of the preposition to. In other words, to is a preposition here and not part of an infinitive (which it would be if it were followed by become).
     
    Last edited:

    kenny4528

    Senior Member
    Mandarin, Taiwan
    Dimcl is right that becoming is correct, but I don't agree with the explanation. The reason it's becoming is that becoming king is a gerund phrase that functions as the direct object of the preposition to. In other words, to is a preposition here and not part of an infinitive (which it would be if it were followed by become).
    Thank you very much, elroy.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I think it's rather an odd turn of phrase, kenny.

    I'd expect "to" after "apprenticeship" in one of two contexts:
    He served a four-year apprenticeship to [learn how to] become a plumber
    He served an apprenticeship to a plumber.

    It doesn't seem to me to fit here. "In" would have been better, but even then it's not the most elegant way to express the idea.

    Where did you come across the sentence?
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    You are totally right, Loob! For some reason, I read the last part as apprenticeship on the way to becoming king!
     

    gasman

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    [as part of his wider training which is being seen as an apprenticeship to becoming king. /QUOTE]

    I find the above a very clumsy way to describe a future fact. I have no problem with "an apprenticeship" but I would prefer a simple "reigning" instead of "becoming king".
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    You have an apprenticeship.
    You are an apprentice to a master of your chosen profession.
    I don't think "apprenticeship to" works in this way. You may serve an apprenticeship to the aforementioned master, but not to the profession.

    So Loob served an apprenticeship to her chosen plumber, but not to plumbing.

    Perhaps kenny would provide us with details of the source of this quoted text (as required by the forum rules, of course).
     

    kenny4528

    Senior Member
    Mandarin, Taiwan
    I think it's rather an odd turn of phrase, kenny.

    I'd expect "to" after "apprenticeship" in one of two contexts:
    He served a four-year apprenticeship to [learn how to] become a plumber
    He served an apprenticeship to a plumber.

    It doesn't seem to me to fit here. "In" would have been better, but even then it's not the most elegant way to express the idea.

    Where did you come across the sentence?
    I came across this sentence from news article. I can't quote the rest part right now but I'd next time if it can clarify a bit. (I think it'd provide you little help, though)
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Thank, kenny. I was just wondering whether the writer was a native English-speaker. I suspect from your additional context that (s)he was, but that on this occasion (s)he simply produced an awkward turn of phrase.
     

    spb

    Senior Member
    English
    How about "an apprenticeship in kingship"? Technically correct, I think, but also inelegant, unfortunately - too many ships!
     
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