apprised/appraised

< Previous | Next >

jeepdad

New Member
english
I know apprise means " to inform" and appraise means "to evaluate the worth of." However, I was recently told that the spelling of apprised changes based on whether the subject is singular or plural.

For example:

"Please keep me apprised of the situation."
"Please keep us appraised of the situtation."

Is this correct or does apprised keep its spelling in both situations?

Thanks!
 
  • Danielle

    Senior Member
    Canada, French & English
    From my knowledge, the 2 words are completly separate. I doubled checked in the 'Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary' and it doesn't mention anything about changing the spelling. So I tried putting both sentences in the translator and it made so sense...
    I think the each word keeps its meaning in singular and in plural.



    jeepdad said:
    I know apprise means " to inform" and appraise means "to evaluate the worth of." However, I was recently told that the spelling of apprised changes based on whether the subject is singular or plural.

    For example:

    "Please keep me apprised of the situation."
    "Please keep us appraised of the situtation."

    Is this correct or does apprised keep its spelling in both situations?

    Thanks!
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    :p :p :p The verb appraise is frequently confused with apprise. Appraise means ‘assess (someone or something)’, as in a need to appraise existing techniques, while apprise means ‘inform (someone)’ and is often used in the structure apprise someone of something, as in psychiatrists were apprised of his condition. In the British National Corpus, 50 per cent of citations for the meaning ‘inform’ incorrectly use appraise rather than apprise, as in once appraised of the real facts, there was only one person who showed any opposition.

    New Oxford Dictionary



    The President has been apprised of the situation.


    Have customers been fully apprised of the advantages?...


    We must apprise them of the dangers that may be involved.

    (c) HarperCollins Publishers.
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    You know? I've also found "apprized" :arrow: with "z" :confused:


    apprize /prz/ v.1t. arch. Also (esp. in sense 2) -ise. LME. [OFr. aprisier, f. as A-5 + pris PRICE n., assim. to PRIZE n.1] 1 Value; esteem. LME. 2 Sc. Law. Put a selling price upon; put up for sale to pay a creditor. obs. exc. Hist. M16. apprizement, (esp. Sc. Law) -isement n. (now arch. & Hist.) the action of apprizing LME. apprizer, (esp. Sc. Law) -iser n. (now arch. & Hist.) a person who apprizes LME.

    ---------------------------------------------------------
    Tomado de Oxford Talking Dictionary
    Copyright © 1998 The Learning Company, Inc. Reservados todos los derechos.
     

    Nick

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Artrella said:
    You know? I've also found "apprized" :arrow: with "z" :confused:
    This is another case of American vs. British English. American English prefers "z", while British English prefers "s". This happens with many words.

    For example, naturalization vs. naturalisation
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    Nick said:
    This is another case of American vs. British English. American English prefers "z", while British English prefers "s". This happens with many words.

    For example, naturalization vs. naturalisation

    Hi Nick!! But this is from a British dictionary and it does not say anything about that difference, as other dictionaries do. :)
     

    Sharon

    Senior Member
    United States, English
    I have never seen the word with a 'z'.

    Am I correct in assuming that the red parts mean "archaic" ??

    "apprize /prz/ v.1t. arch. Also (esp. in sense 2) -ise. LME. [OFr. aprisier, f. as A-5 + pris PRICE n., assim. to PRIZE n.1] 1 Value; esteem. LME. 2 Sc. Law. Put a selling price upon; put up for sale to pay a creditor. obs. exc. Hist. M16. apprizement, (esp. Sc. Law) -isement n. (now arch. & Hist.) the action of apprizing LME. apprizer, (esp. Sc. Law) -iser n. (now arch. & Hist.) a person who apprizes LME."

    Sharon.:)
     

    Ralf

    Senior Member
    German
    Sharon said:
    I have never seen the word with a 'z'.

    Am I correct in assuming that the red parts mean "archaic" ??....
    I would have read it this way, too. However, "apprize" looks extremely strange to me. Perhaps it has to do with the number of syllables. At least most words I am aware of to be spelled with both "s" and "z" have more than two syllables: generalize, summarize, materialize, but advise, precise, surprise ....(On the other hand "apprize" might simply refer to the noun "prize".) But I'm afraid this will lead farther away from the original point of this thread.
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    Sharon said:
    I have never seen the word with a 'z'.

    Am I correct in assuming that the red parts mean "archaic" ??

    "apprize /prz/ v.1t. arch. Also (esp. in sense 2) -ise. LME. [OFr. aprisier, f. as A-5 + pris PRICE n., assim. to PRIZE n.1] 1 Value; esteem. LME. 2 Sc. Law. Put a selling price upon; put up for sale to pay a creditor. obs. exc. Hist. M16. apprizement, (esp. Sc. Law) -isement n. (now arch. & Hist.) the action of apprizing LME. apprizer, (esp. Sc. Law) -iser n. (now arch. & Hist.) a person who apprizes LME."

    Sharon.:)


    Yes, Sharon you are right!! arch>> archaic use of the word; old-fashioned; dated >>> these words appear in the word entry for the reader to know if the word is currently in use or not. :p
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    There is no let-up to the confusion between "apprise" and "appraise": yesterday a so-called quality British newspaper reported that James Murdoch (son of Rupert) had appraised ITV of the fact that Sky TV had bought a stake in it.

    Of course, the young Mr Murdoch had actually apprised ITV of what had happened.

    Now, appraise, when spoken in a heavy Cockney accent, might sound like apprise. Could it be that the metropolitan media elite wishes to distance itself from such a supposedly down-market pronunciation? We do after all live in highly status-anxious times!
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    This gross error appears at all levels.
    It has been a source of irritation to me for decades.
    First because it is an error.
    Second because in most cases it is used by someone who thinks it sounds fancy.
    Well, in a way the second helps to cancel the irritation a little, because as far as I am concerned it makes them sound careless and illiterate.

    In writing, I am inclined to assume that it is an over-zealous correction by someone who is very familiar with appraise but has never heard of apprise (which is not surprising - it is rarely used).

    In speech, there is no such excuse.
     

    palashdave

    New Member
    English - England (London, Eton, Oxford) and familiarity with some Indian and American Englishes
    My dear panjandrum, do you perhaps mean to say "diminish the irritation a little", rather than "cancel" it? The latter is an absolute, all-or-nothing sort of action, which can't be quantified by "a little". (Rather as one oughtn't to say "very unique", though I hear that one all the time....)
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top