Arabic word ذهن

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seyif

Member
Turkish
Hello,

The word ذهن has very few meanings and it seemed it could be a loan-word from another language. Do you have any idea about that?

As a second question do you recommend it to use a counterpart of Ancient Greek "nous"?
 
  • Faylasoof

    Senior Member
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    Hello,

    The word
    ذهن has very few meanings and it seemed it could be a loan-word from another language. Do you have any idea about that?

    As a second question do you recommend it to use a counterpart of Ancient Greek "nous"?
    Not really sure what you mean but as Origumi has pointed out, the Arabic ذهن has found its way into many languages.

    We use
    ذهن in Urdu (and so in colloquial Hindi too) with the same meaning as in the original Arabic = mind, intellect, etc.

    Here
    is the relevant page of Woodhouse’s online English-Attic Greek dictionary! The English mind = Attic Greek νους.
     

    Arabus

    Senior Member
    Arabic-Aleppo
    I assure you it is native Arabic. It is probably from Afro-Asiatic origin.

    You can know by comparing the root to other similar roots in the same language. There are many roots in Arabic similar to this root phonologically and semantically, so it must be native and ancient one.

    dh h n = mind
    dh h l = astonish
    dh h b = gold
    dh 3 r= scare
    etc.
     

    origumi

    Senior Member
    Hebrew
    You can know by comparing the root to other similar roots in the same language. There are many roots in Arabic similar to this root phonologically and semantically, so it must be native and ancient one.
    There are two few 3-letters combinations to justify such claim unless there's a clear connection between the roots meaning. For example, how mind and gold are similar? Also, it's important to show that the roots were'nt different originally and becames similar as a result of sound shifts.
     

    إسكندراني

    Senior Member
    عربي (مصر)ـ | en (gb)
    ذِهْن
    Mind, learned-by-heart, understanding, shrewdness, strength - a verb is derived from it allowing comparison of how much ذهن a person has compared to another
    Source: لسان العرب، القاموس المحيط، الصحاح في اللغة.
    None seem to suggest it's imported from another language, but nor do they suggest it's derived from a 3-letter root.
    Maybe someone can rummage some more :D
     

    Mahaodeh

    Senior Member
    Arabic, PA and IA.
    I have to disagree with you Iskandarani, it is actually listed under a three letter root ذ ه ن!!

    Anyhow, why do you need more three letter roots to prove that it's Arabic? It's used in Arabic, all other languages that use it have clearly borrowed it from Arabic, there is no evidence that it is a loanword in Arabic (having only a handful of meanings is not evidence, it's just a possibility), no other language claims it, so why would anyone assume that it's not Arabic.

    I don't have a problem with it being a loanword, but we can't just assume words are loanwords just because the root has a handful of words listed in it. There are over 6500 roots listed in Lisaan Al Arab, assuming (just a guess) 80% are pure Arabic, that would be 5200 root. If each root is going to have 100 words in it then we will easily exceed 5 million words in the Lisaan alone (and it's about 900 years old).

    Common sense says, not all roots in Arabic need to have a dozen meanings with a dozen words for each meaning and a dozen entries for each word. Besides, it can be purely Arabic, but more recent than other roots - we are allowed to invent new words and classify them under new roots you know. We've done it before, heck, every language has done it before.
     

    Ghabi

    Senior Member
    Cantonese
    Besides, it can be purely Arabic, but more recent than other roots - we are allowed to invent new words and classify them under new roots you know.
    This is well said, Maha.:thumbsup: I also want to point to those obviously very old words like يد and دم, which have no other derivatives مشتق than one or two corresponding adjectives.
     
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