Aramaic: ܥܵܠܡܵܢܵܝܵܐ

fdb

Senior Member
French (France)
Moderator's Note:The following discussion is split from this thread in the Arabic forum.
adapted to fit Arabic patterns better by shortening the first vowel).
Quite the contrary is the case. The shortening of the stem vowel before the nisba ending in ʽalm-ānī is a characteristically Aramaic phenomenon, very well known in Syriac (where all the vowels are clearly indicated). It is the same thing that happened with the name of the town Ḥarrān > Aramaic nisba Ḥarr(ə)n-ānāyā > Arabic nisba Ḥarnānī.
 
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  • Drink

    Senior Member
    English - New England, Russian - Moscow
    If that's the case, then it must have been a late borrowing. The Peshitta New Testament spells the word with a long vowel: ܥܵܠܡܵܢܵܝܵܐ (`ālmānāyā). Look up Hebrews 9:1, for example, here or here.
     

    fdb

    Senior Member
    French (France)
    If that's the case, then it must have been a late borrowing. The Peshitta New Testament spells the word with a long vowel: ܥܵܠܡܵܢܵܝܵܐ (`ālmānāyā). Look up Hebrews 9:1, for example, here or here.
    ...or a borrowing not from Syriac, but from another of the Aramaic languages.

    My point is simply that the shortening of the stem vowel is a typical feature in Aramaic, but not in Arabic. In individual cases there is often a paradigmatic levelling in Syriac, resulting in the retention (or reinstatement) of the long vowel.
     
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    Drink

    Senior Member
    English - New England, Russian - Moscow
    Ok, but you said this phenomenon is very well known in Syriac. Could you give some examples of it in Syriac? Note that your example of Ḥarrān > Ḥarr(ə)nānāyā is a bit different, because that vowel is directly before the nisba, while in `āl(ə)mā > `āl(ə)mānāyā, there is another consonant and optional schwa in between.
     

    Drink

    Senior Member
    English - New England, Russian - Moscow
    Thanks for the sources, but I cannot find any examples of this in them. Brockelmann mentions the phenomenon in your example of Ḥarrān > Ḥarr(ə)nānāyā (i.e. -āC > -(ə)Cāyā), but says nothing about -āCVC > -aC(ə)Cāyā. Nöldeke doesn't mention either of them. If I am missing something, could you tell me exactly which page and paragraph it is in?
     
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